Renault Captur dCi 90 review

Renault's Captur crossover will mainly suit British buyers in dCi 90 diesel form. Jonathan Crouch looks at the revised version.

Ten Second Review

The Renault Captur sits in a crowded market of compact crossover vehicles such as the Nissan Juke and the Peugeot 2008, but brings with it some genuinely clever interior touches and no small dose of style. This facelifted version offers a smarter look, a classier interior and extra safety technology. As before, some super-economical engines also feature, particularly the dCi 90 diesel unit featured here. Expect the Captur to attract the sort of buyer who likes the way the Nissan Juke drives but who would prefer prettier styling.

Background

Aside from its electric vehicle development, modern Renault is not a company steeped in innovation - and there's a reason for that. Often, when it 's tried something genuinely innovative, the result has often proven to be a commercial disaster. Think Safrane, Avantime, Vel Satis, Clio V6 and so forth. Where Renault really does tend to strike gold is by taking existing vehicle genres, then refining them and adding style and ability. The company's Renaultsport hot hatches are one example of this. Their award-winning MPVs are another. In both cases, the French brand borrowed from other companies' pioneering ideas but packaged the products so well they became bywords for excellence in their segments. It's done the same with the Captur, a small crossover vehicle that's spun off the same Clio-derived chassis that underpins its partner, Nissan's big-selling Juke. This Renault was launched in 2013 and since then has dominated the smaller part of the crossover segment alongside the Juke. We're looking at a facelifted Captur here, which will continue to be a strong seller in the dCi 90 diesel form we're featuring in this test.

Driving Experience

The Captur's pedigree can't really be questioned. Its underpinnings and engine choices are well proven, none more so than the Energy dCi 90 1.5-litre engine in the variant we're looking at here. In a comparable Nissan Juke, this same unit puts out another 20bhp, but most buyers won't really notice the lack of those extra braked horses, given perfectly adequate performance figures here of rest to 62mph in around 13s on the way to a top speed of 106mph. Don't get any designs on off-roading though. The Captur's not really into all that. You only need to look at how snugly the wheels fit into the arches to figure that out. There's no 4WD option and there won't be for the platform this car rides upon hasn't been designed to take it. In compensation, we'd expected that the engineers behind this car might have added in the kind of 'grip control' system you'd find on something like a Peugeot 2008 so that you can maximise front wheel traction on slippery surfaces. But Renault hasn't bothered with that either, instead equipping it with something that'll probably be of much more use on poor surfaces: decent ground clearance. With 200mm of ride height (the Peugeot, in contrast, has only 165mm), you'd be able to get a surprisingly long way on muddy tracks in this car if you equipped it with a proper set of winter tyres.

Design and Build

The Captur's nothing like as divisive as its cousin, the Nissan Juke. In fact it's a very clean design with some very slick detailing. Renault calls it an 'urban crossover with an unpretentious look' and that's pretty much spot on. Its footprint is small at just 4.12m long and 1.77m wide, while the 200mm ground clearance gives it a nicely elevated driving position. Changes made to this facelifted version include a modified radiator grille that features smarter chrome trim and can be flanked by full-LED 'Pure Vision' front headlights that bring the look of this baby Crossover even closer to that of its larger Kadjar stablemate. At both the front and rear, the bumper incorporates smarter skid plates. The cabin has been upgraded too, benefitting from higher-quality plastics, extra chrome trimming and more comfortable seats. The steering wheel is made from more upmarket materials and, on certain versions, comes trimmed with full-grain leather. The gear lever boasts a more modern appearance, while the door panels have been revised to seamlessly incorporate buttons and controls. At the same time, the New Captur retains its most practical features, including the availability of removable upholstery and the 'Grip Xtend' traction system, depending on trim level. As before, all variants get a pretty unique feature in this class, a sliding rear bench that moves backwards or forwards by up to 160mm (though only as one unit), enabling you to prioritise either legroom or bootspace. Position the seats to maximise luggage space and cargo capacity rises from 377-litres to 455-litres. And you get a false boot floor that can be repositioned to suit the height of the load you need to carry and has a wipe-clean reversible flip side. Push forward the 60/40 split-folding rear seat and you'll find that it doesn't quite lie fully flat but in this position, you do get access to 1,234-litres of total fresh air.

Market and Model

A diesel Captur will cost you around £1,400 more than a petrol one - which means prices for the dCi90 variant starting from around £17,500. One trend that Renault has certainly signed up to with this car is that of personalisation. MINI really got the ball rolling with this one and Fiat's 500 and Citroen's DS3 quickly jumped on board. In the same vein, and the Captur features some interesting ways to minimalise the chances of ever seeing a vehicle identical to yours on the roads. It's possible to specify two-tone paintwork to provide a contrast between the roof and pillars and the rest of the body. Plus you can change the colour of the wheels, specify decor graphics for the bonnet, roof or tailgate, or choose from a range of themed decor packs to decorate the steering wheel and upholstery, co-ordinating them with the exterior graphics. Three multimedia systems are fitted according to equipment level: R&GO, Media Nav and R-LINK, the latter now compatible with 'Android Auto' for smartphone linking purposes. There's also now the option of a desirable 7-speaker BOSE premium audio system. New safety systems include a Blind Spot Warning system that on the move, will stop you from dangerously pulling out to overtake in front of another vehicle. Buyers of higher-end versions can also spcify a 'Hands Free Parking' function that can help you find a space, then automatically steer you into it.

Cost of Ownership

To reduce running costs, the Captur benefits from efforts Renault has invested in weight reduction, aerodynamics and high efficiency tyres. Its weight is the same as that of Clio III, even though it has a larger footprint. Whenever the cooling requirement reduces, powered flaps behind the bumper automatically close off the air intakes, reducing drag. Meanwhile, ducting inside the engine compartment channels the flow of air, again improving aerodynamic performance. Last but not least, ultra-low rolling resistance tyres reduce fuel consumption by up to three per cent. As a driver, you can do your part too if you keep an eye on the gearshift indicator light and also use the so-called 'Driving Style indicator' that's offered on models fitted with the R-Link multimedia system. It's based around a light in the instrument display that aims to provide real-time feedback on the way you're driving based on your speed, gearshifts and deceleration. Green, yellow or orange lights with varying levels of brightness help adapt your driving style. And you can even analyse it all via an 'eco2' function in the R-Link system that can produce efficiency 'Trip reports' on each journey, can compare the efficiency of journeys conducted on the same route and even offers so-called 'Eco-coaching' with personalised driving tips. Get it all right and you'll be looking at 76.4mpg and 95g/km from the dCi 90 engine in the Captur variant we're looking at here.

Summary

The success of the Renault Captur might well be best summed up by a friend of mine who test drove a Nissan Juke, liked it and then showed a photo of it to his wife who nixed the idea on the spot because of the way the car looked. The Renault shares many of the Juke's attributes but it's wrapped in a shape that's a good deal less divisive and also features an interior that's a lot smarter. I'd have liked to have seen an all-wheel drive version with a diesel engine but that doesn't seem to be in Renault's plans and even with drive just going to the front wheels, the Captur is a fun and appealing thing with a wholesomely practical side too. Cheeky, versatile and cost-effective in dCi 90 diesel form, with smart engine tech and a stylish interior, this Renault will continue to put quite a few of its immediate rivals in a tight spot.

RAC Loans

Apply today to get an instant decision and approved funds within 3 days*

*RAC Loans is a trading name of RAC Financial Services Limited who are acting as a credit broker. Registered in England and Wales no. 5171817. Registered office: RAC House, Brockhurst Crescent, Walsall, WS5 4AW. RAC Financial Services Limited is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority. RAC Loans are provided by Shawbrook Bank Limited, Registered Office: Lutea House, Warley Hill Business Park, The Drive, Great Warley, Brentwood, Essex CM13 3BE. Registered in England, Company Number 388466. Authorised by the Prudential Regulation Authority and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority and the Prudential Regulation Authority.