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Thread: Health and driving

  1. #11
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    When I was in the ambulance service, I never came across many cases where them medical Tags were actually used?Which is surprising really, as the most common instance we had, was people who were diabetic, as symptoms shown in some instances, could mimic being violently drunk, to being semi or unconscious?Of course we were all trained to ask the patient about allergies, but that can't always be answered if the patient can't hear you?

  2. #12
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    Oops! A double post, due to present site problems?

  3. #13
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    Oct 2009
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    QUOTE>>>>>>>>> Default Health and driving

    Did you know that a bad back could slow your breaking? A heavy cold can halve your concentration? Or that you can travel up to 50ft with your eyes closed during a sneeze?

    Whilst it's important to obey the Highway Code and respect speed limits, our health and well-being can also compromise our safety behind the wheel.

    How do you think health might affect the way we drive? <<<<<<<<<<<<<QUOTE

    As per my article in the MG Owners Club magazine back in the early 1990's.

  4. #14
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    Feb 2007
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    Smudger, that is really scary! I'm an event first aider and we're taught to search for such items/ask friends or family who might be present to ask if they have allergies, etc., whilst others working on an unresponsive casualty.

  5. #15
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    Aye! We used to do that if it was a house call out, as there is always friends or family there. But you don't always have available, if it's a RTA, and no one knows anything about the causality.A lot of our jobs were drug addicts who had overdosed, or alcoholics who had passed out altogether, and we couldn't get any information from the folk who were, as they were out of it as well?

  6. #16
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    Smudger, I wonder how many people are diabetic but don't know it. I know that when I was in Hospital some years back in the Coronary Care Ward, most of the patients didn't find out they were diabeitc until they filled in their first daily menu, only to be told they could not have particular items they had checked because they were diabetic.

  7. #17
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    Aye! Rolebama the thing with being diabetes is, that there are so many variations and levels of it, which all require different treatments.It can be treated with a simple change of diet, to taking pills up to self medicating with injections of insulin. Some people don't even know they have it, until they go for a check up with their GP, a mate of mine only found out that he was diabetic, when he went for his medical to work offshore? As up until then he never showed any symptoms?

  8. #18
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    Oct 2009
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    I was a fully trained RGN in critical care (retd) I also have NMC certificate in diabetic nursing as part of my qualifications and have much input into many hospitals in the NW regarding diabetic patients in the critical care and theatre environment. Believe me knowledge of diabetes is diabolical in the NHS except on specialist diabetic wards. Even then, some nurses do not have the qualification in diabetic nursing.

  9. #19
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    Apr 2012
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    Specialisation is a problem in the NHS. As a rule it is a bad idea to have more than one medical problem at a time. For example, if you are in an orthopedic ward with a broken leg, the nurses will know little about the management of your diabetes. If you are in a cardiac ward with sever asthma, they are quite likely to try to take your inhalers away - "We can't allow patients to self medicate"... Even though they may have been self medicating for decades.

  10. #20
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    Aye! When my wife went into the hospice in Dunfermline last week, they told us to leave All her medications at home. Then they phoned me and asked me to bring them all in, then when I did, I was asked to take them all home again?I'm not criticising them in any way, as it was probably an admin problem, but the staff there are taking such good care of my wife in there.I just wish the admin staff were as committed to their work, as the nursing staff are.

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