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Thread: My Parked car damaged by neighbours car?

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Loony View Post
    My cars been damaged and think my neighbour has done it.
    Do I.......

    A)knock on their door
    B)ask the internet

    Sorry I just don't understand why you would not knock on their door and take it from there.
    We've had every choice from doing nothing, to diplomatic approach, to going down the official route.
    being a 'neighbour' involvement, I can understand the OP possibly having already decided how he wants to play it, but may want forum members' opinions in order to assess whether his own idea of dealing with it is too soft or OTT.

    The subject of intimidation has been raised. It is a criminal offence to threaten violence in order to divert the course of justice. If the neighbour, to the OPs knowledge, is likely to get nasty, then this fear should be mentioned to the police at the time of reporting the offence, and make sure that worry is recorded.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Loony View Post
    My cars been damaged and think my neighbour has done it.
    Do I.......

    A)knock on their door
    B)ask the internet

    Sorry I just don't understand why you would not knock on their door and take it from there.
    That opens up a can of worms. Why would anyone seek advice about anything from random strangers on the internet, like Loony and me?

    "Discuss" as they say in university exams.

  3. #13
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    I'm with Santa on this. If possible solve problems through respectful communication and expect the best. Obviously if this fails consider other options. Thinking about the possible effect on your life is not, in my opinion, fear but sensible.

  4. #14
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    This happened to me.
    My neighbour would not admit he had done it when I approached him, even though there was marks on his car. Until he polished them out once I had been round.

    Its so frustrating, gets me so angry.
    I hope you get it sorted.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by belucky22 View Post
    I'm with Santa on this. If possible solve problems through respectful communication and expect the best. Obviously if this fails consider other options. Thinking about the possible effect on your life is not, in my opinion, fear but sensible.
    People who go around damaging the property of others must love this approach. Hope for the best, which obviously did not happen, and don't push the matter in case it causes unpleasantness.

    Quote Originally Posted by ParkerM View Post
    This happened to me.
    My neighbour would not admit he had done it when I approached him, even though there was marks on his car. Until he polished them out once I had been round.

    Its so frustrating, gets me so angry.
    I hope you get it sorted.
    An excellent example of why you should take a firm view and simply tell the neighbour, "face up to your responsibilities and make restitution, or it goes to law. Their initial attitude has, in my opinion, already proved them to be a bad neighbour.

  6. #16
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    Snowball, It depends a good deal on the characters of the people concerned. We have all read, and no doubt some have experienced, the horrendous things that some individuals are prepared to do to their neighbours. In an ideal world, the incident would never have come up. In the real world, everyone has to make their own decision.

    On the truck forum I frequent there are discussions about what to do if a driver wakes up to find that their load is being robbed. Of course 999 is the first reaction, but the police can take a long time to arrive. The more macho (maybe keyboard warriors of course) advocate an iron bar. The more sensible take the view that they have no reason to risk their lives, and wait for the police.

  7. #17
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    Santa, you cannot compare a neighbour dispute with that of a lorry load being robbed. No employed person should be foolish enough take on the risk of injury, or worse, by tackling people robbing their employer's property.
    However, if someone in the OP's position feels that a neighbour might carry out reprisals, then they should inform the police of this fear when reporting the incident.
    Accepting the costs of a wrongful act by a third party, on the basis of fear of reprisal, is the first step to accepting an anarchy society which is, in the longer term, a very dangerous road down which to go.

  8. #18
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    I am retired now. But I am sure most of my co-workers Would have confronted criminals attempting to steal our employers property.

  9. #19
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    When I started work at one particular place, I was asked if I would take on the job of escorting the young lady who used to do the company banking. It was about a five-minute walk to the Bank. When I had been doing it for a couple of weeks, and we got to know each other a little, she told me that she felt safer in my company due to me being such a big bloke, and that she also felt more relieved at having someone to help guard the money. I advised her that as far as I was concerned, I was not going along to guard the money, and that if approached seriously, she should just hand the money over. I was only there for her protection, which I would willingly do. When we got back, she told the Manager, and he asked me if what she had told him was true. I told him yes, to which he answered that he was not too happy that I had that attitude. I told him that if he really felt that way, perhaps he should take the money to the Bank in future. Suddenly he was happy to let myself and the young lady carry on.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis W View Post
    I am retired now. But I am sure most of my co-workers Would have confronted criminals attempting to steal our employers property.
    I am also retired, Dennis, but times have changed since the days when I would have considered myself able to offer resistance in the way you describe. Robbers are now prepared to be more violent, and the 'do-gooders' of modern society have removed the ultimate punishment that would make a would-be violent thief think twice.
    Even those who disagree with capital punishment must concede that the 'protection' which removal of it offers to a violent criminal also denies a victim the protection from the criminal being prepared to go too far.

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