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Thread: New Tyre Labels, Has anyone seen them yet in tyre depots?

  1. #1
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    Default New Tyre Labels, Has anyone seen them yet in tyre depots?

    I have just read that new trye labelling regs come in later this year. Have you seen any in tyre depots yet. please?

  2. #2
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    just done a google search, results below, but basically the new labels are like the one's on electrical goods, with a rating for Fuel Efficiency and Wet Grip, plus Traffic Noise (road noise)

    European Commission Regulation 1222/2009 requires that all tyres* produced after June 2012 and on sale in the EU from November 2012 will either need to bear a sticker or be accompanied by a label to be displayed at the point of sale.

    An example of the new EU Tyre Label can be seen to the right. This is similar to labelling already in wide use for household goods such as washing machines and dishwashers.

    More information about the new tyre labelling regulations as well as a list of FAQs is available from the European Tyre & Rubber Manufacturers' Association (ETRMA).
    Wet Grip

    The most important role of a tyre is to provide safety - in all conditions. Wet adherence or grip is one of the most important performance characteristics.

    However, higher adherence and lower rolling resistance are often contradictory objectives that have traditionally required a performance trade-off. Thanks to the new labelling regulation, customers will be able to see and choose for themselves their preferred performances.

    The label will display a range of 7 grades where tyres with an “A” provide the highest levels of wet grip and “G” the lowest.
    Fuel Efficiency

    One of the forces influencing the fuel efficiency of a motorised vehicle is the Rolling Resistance of the tyres.

    This phenomenon exists because a tyre deforms when rotating, resulting in energy losses in the form of heat. The higher the deformation, the higher the tyre rolling resistance, and consequently the more fuel required to move the vehicle forward. In other words, lower rolling resistance means lower fuel consumption and therefore lower vehicle emissions, including CO2.

    The new label will display different grades in “rolling resistance” where A is the most “fuel efficient” and G the worst in class. The black arrow (in this case B) next to the grading indicates the performance level of the product.
    Traffic Noise

    Traffic noise is a relevant environmental issue, determined by:
    • Traffic intensity and vehicle types
    • Driving style
    • Tyre-Road interaction

    Exterior noise levels are split into 3 categories and measured in decibel (dB) in comparison with the new European tyre exterior noise levels to be introduced until 2016.

    1 black sound wave = 3dB less than the future tighter European limit.
    2 black sound waves = already compliant with the future European limit.
    3 black sound waves = compliant with the current European limit.

    The regulation aims at increasing the safety and the economic and environmental efficiency of road transport by promoting safe and fuel-efficient tyres with low noise levels. It also establishes a framework for the provision of harmonised information across the industry on some tyre parameters.

    Such information will, at all times, be available for customers through technical promotional material, including the websites of the manufacturers. Some tyres are excluded, such as retreaded tyres, off-road tyres and racing tyres.
    The expected cumulative benefits from the increased use of fuel efficient tyres will lead to saving up to 4 million tonnes of CO2 per year (depending on the speed of market transformation towards fuel efficient tyres) , and will also drive the market towards improved wet grip performance.

    For more information call 01732 864 999

  3. #3
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    Your post, tommytwotanks, indicates to me that the majority of drivers will never study the full details of these new tyre labels. The most likely attitude will be to take the advice of tyre-fitting companies in deciding whch tyres to have fitted. It seems to be another case of Brussels introducing yet one more piece of "can't see the woods for the trees" legislation.

    Personally, for anyone with a model of car that is still in production, I would say just go to a dealership and look at what OE tyres are being fitted on the new cars. For the average driver, these new labels will be confusing and/or meaningless. Concise and simple information is the key to guidance for the masses; a factor for which Brussels is wantonly lacking.

  4. #4
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    yes i think most people buy on price first rather than quality, but it depends on who is paying for the new tyres, the average joe buys budjet/economy, lease/fleet cars get what the retailer wants to fit, subject to approvel and proformance car owners tend to fit better quality brands, if in the near future they plan to sale, to give the impression that its maintained/driven to a higher standard than it is, i was bought up to look for matching sets of tyres when car hunting, i wouldn't be impressed if i was looking for a porsche for instance, and when i looked at the tyres i found every corner had a different brand of tyre

  5. #5
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    Snowball

    Personally, for anyone with a model of car that is still in production, I would say just go to a dealership and look at what OE tyres are being fitted on the new cars.
    &

    tommytwotanks

    i wouldn't be impressed if i was looking for a porsche for instance, and when i looked at the tyres i found every corner had a different brand of tyre
    WELL DONE and very well pointed out by both of you!

    ... and this is what amazes me, you're average 'dimwit' family will happily buy a newish (boring!) car on 'tick' and thus cost them thousands of pounds over a period of time (and not realise this as they are too preoccupied with 'more important issues' - such as getting their little darling into 'ballet class' etc.), yet will not spend a few hundred pounds on a decent set of four tyres when required!

  6. #6
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    Aye! it doesn't matter how much horse power or torque the car has, its only that small area of tyre on each wheel, about the size of a A4 sheet of paper, that keeps it on the road.

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    Quote Originally Posted by WRX._.GTi View Post
    &



    WELL DONE and very well pointed out by both of you!

    ... and this is what amazes me, you're average 'dimwit' family will happily buy a newish (boring!) car on 'tick' and thus cost them thousands of pounds over a period of time (and not realise this as they are too preoccupied with 'more important issues' - such as getting their little darling into 'ballet class' etc.), yet will not spend a few hundred pounds on a decent set of four tyres when required!
    I am a little puzzled by your aversion to "new,boring cars purchased 'on tick'!" In reality there is no such thing as a 'boring' car. Buyers of cars go for what is particularly suited to their own needs. To ignore this factor and buy what another driver thinks suitable would be foolish.

    Providing that any 'on tick' finance has been incurred within a sutainable planned budget, then this is the buyer's business only.

    I tow a caravan that is almost as heavy (but within manufacturer's allowed limit) as the vehicle itself, so reliability (new and free from wear) is essential to me. Regarding finance, I did take a part of the cost 'on tick', but purchase was planned at the best time for buying, and the same model now would cost me more if bought outright today.

    As for tyres, I always buy premium grade (Michelin Energy) and discard them for new ones at 3 mm tread depth. This is an industry standard recommendation for maintaining full braking and steering control under all road conditions.

    In approaching the purchase of a motor vehicle, "eye-catching" styling and gizmos are way down the list of priorities. Safety, reliability and comfort, along with the vehicle beng fully capable and suitable for the work that will be demanded of it, are paramount.

  8. #8
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    Snowball
    ^
    I was actually agreeing with the advice you said in ' post 3'and inturn was tring to give a sort of 'general example', however...

    ...you just have to show how you think you are the 'big I am/know it all - telling everyone how your are a caravaner etc. - that just about sums you up ...I can think of no bigger nusance on the roads that the obligatory 'blue rinse' brigade poddling along in with caravan in tow holding everybody up!

    In view of your comments it makes me wonder if I've actually joined a 'Motoring Forum' (i.e for like minded vehicle enthusiasts!) or if I've joined 'The sad old git/boring pleb wagon forum'!

    No doubt after this statement I will probably get a 'ban' - if so I leave you to your 'Beige Nissan Micras', 'Grey Volvo Estates' or many assorted 'Silver People Carriers'!

    P.S: I'm Just off to alter the negative camber on the rear suspension a bit more on a certain 'toy' of mine so that I can do better power slides when 'drifting' round bends ...and get 'em rear wide tyres a smokin'!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by WRX._.GTi View Post
    Snowball

    P.S: I'm Just off to alter the negative camber on the rear suspension a bit more on a certain 'toy' of mine so that I can do better power slides when 'drifting' round bends ...and get 'em rear wide tyres a smokin'!
    Why, it is not the quickest /safest way around a corner and it tends to be rather expensive on tyres. Perhaps a little more practice at throttle control is the solution to your problem.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by WRX._.GTi View Post
    Snowball
    ^
    I was actually agreeing with the advice you said in ' post 3'and inturn was tring to give a sort of 'general example', however...

    ...you just have to show how you think you are the 'big I am/know it all - telling everyone how your are a caravaner etc. - that just about sums you up ...I can think of no bigger nusance on the roads that the obligatory 'blue rinse' brigade poddling along in with caravan in tow holding everybody up!

    In view of your comments it makes me wonder if I've actually joined a 'Motoring Forum' (i.e for like minded vehicle enthusiasts!) or if I've joined 'The sad old git/boring pleb wagon forum'!

    No doubt after this statement I will probably get a 'ban' - if so I leave you to your 'Beige Nissan Micras', 'Grey Volvo Estates' or many assorted 'Silver People Carriers'!

    P.S: I'm Just off to alter the negative camber on the rear suspension a bit more on a certain 'toy' of mine so that I can do better power slides when 'drifting' round bends ...and get 'em rear wide tyres a smokin'!
    And I was giving just another sort of 'general example'. The forum covers a wider spectrum of drivers than you seem to appreciate, but I didn't expect an abusive outburst against a particular section. As for caravans causing hold-ups, they are subject to the same speed limits as HGV's, So, caravan or HGV, behind either will slow cars down. If I get a column of cars behind me, and a convenient layby materialises, I do pull over to let them by; you don't see HGV's do that!

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