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Thread: Should you use Warning Triangles on Motorways?

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rolebama View Post
    Any motorist will see a car on the hard shoulder at night, providing they are awake. If they are asleep, it doesn't matter what you do in terms of safety, it is a waste of time. Unfortunately, I have had an AA vehicle very badly damaged by an articulated unit and trailer because the driver fell asleep at the wheel. He admitted this, not only to myself, but also to the Police when they arrived. Falling asleep is also believed to be a factor in a number of fatalities involving hard shoulders at night, but almost impossible to prove.
    In terms of the original thread, I agree that the risk involved in putting out a triangle, on a motorway hard shoulder, is too high to be worth doing.
    My experience of working motorways at night extends to being a Night Patrol for the AA for ten years, working the M25, M3, M4, M1, M40, M10 and M41.( The M10 and M41 have now been downgraged to an A classification.) Including doing breakdowns for other garages, this extends to around a twenty year period.
    If the vehicle or its trailer have no lights or defective lights AND the weather conditions are poor then a broken down vehicle may not be visible.

    If the vehicle is a JCB or farm vehicle on an A road with defective lighting and moving slowly it may not be visible.

  2. #22
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    See we are off topic again, no longer on a motorway?

    If the JCB or farm vehicle is 'moving' slowly, why on earth would it need a warning triangle placed on the road?????????
    Last edited by Hometune; 07-08-12 at 22:31.

  3. #23
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    The point being that Many JCB and similar construction vehicles are often in a dangerous condition.

    I have been travelling behind a JCB with defective rear lights on an A road. A fast moving vehicle would have crashed into it before they realised it was there.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Santa View Post
    It will have reflectors and an alert driver will see it. If he can't see them - he won't see a triangle.
    In an ideal world, and in ideal conditions yes. But in the real world possibly the reflectors will be obscured by mud, or be obscured by the driver or his passengers fiddling about at the back of the vehicle trying to get the spare wheel out of the boot.

  5. #25
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    Sorry, Dennis, but I cannot see how a motorist can not see a car on the hard shoulder of a motorway.I agree that there are conditions that make it difficult, but I can not agree that any group of circumstances can make it invisible. As to the rest, I have come across unlit trailers being used at night in heavy fog, but I noticed the 'swirl' in the fog ahead, and guessed there was something there. As to the rest of it, my headlights and my eyes will pick them out.

  6. #26
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    Speaking of lights, are they new "Blue" bulbs I see quite often on our roads, any good or better then the usual type?

  7. #27
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    There was a thread about them Smudger, but in answer to your question, yes, they are very much better at dazzling on-coming motorists. When dazzled it takes them several miles before their eyes work properly.

  8. #28
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    Ah! cheers for that Wagolynn, but I meant for normal drivers who dip their headlights when they meet oncoming traffic.

    Its just that her lad has just fitted a set onto his Ford estate, but hasn't told me what they are like
    .

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rolebama View Post
    Any motorist will see a car on the hard shoulder at night, providing they are awake. If they are asleep, it doesn't matter what you do in terms of safety, it is a waste of time. Unfortunately, I have had an AA vehicle very badly damaged by an articulated unit and trailer because the driver fell asleep at the wheel. He admitted this, not only to myself, but also to the Police when they arrived. Falling asleep is also believed to be a factor in a number of fatalities involving hard shoulders at night, but almost impossible to prove.
    In terms of the original thread, I agree that the risk involved in putting out a triangle, on a motorway hard shoulder, is too high to be worth doing.
    My experience of working motorways at night extends to being a Night Patrol for the AA for ten years, working the M25, M3, M4, M1, M40, M10 and M41.( The M10 and M41 have now been downgraged to an A classification.) Including doing breakdowns for other garages, this extends to around a twenty year period.
    Do you not take account of slightly out of the ordinary events? A caravan or trailer may be abandoned on the hard shoulder, or a boat on a trailer. I have seen this on many occaisions. The trailer has had a flat tyre and they have no spare for it, so they struggle for an hour to remove the flat tyre, then abandon the trailer while they try to get the tyre repaired.

    Or a military vehicle may break down and all its lights may be out. There are many scenarios in which there may be a badly lit obstruction on the hard shoulder or even on the carriageway.

  10. #30
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    Dennis, re: 'There are many scenarios in which there may be a badly lit obstruction on the hard shoulder or even on the carriageway.'
    None of this matters as I drive with my headlights on, and every motorway I have ever driven on my lights will pick them up. I have come across all kinds of objects on 'live' carriageways and they have never caused me concern because I have seen them. In fog and falling snow I drive at a speed relevant to conditions, and have come across unlit cars in these circumstances also. I have never hit any of them, I have never worked out my motorway mileage, but it must run into tens of thousands of miles since I first started driving, and have never been taken by surprise. I am fully aware of collisions involving people and cars on hard shoulders, but most of these are traced back to either drivers being asleep, or in one instance, where the Police proved that the guy was spending too much time playing with his new company-supplied mobile phone. These characters will never go away, and nothing you can do will ever protect us against them.

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