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Thread: Red traffic Lights

  1. #11
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    Dec 2007
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    as from

    UKPOLICEONLINE

    If there is no stop line, the law is (or was!) that the vehicle must stop at the light, until it changes to green.

  2. #12
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    Apr 2007
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    In our small town there is a dual carriageway that changes to single carriageway at a cross roads. Coming to the crossroads and on the approach side of the traffic lights, there is double set of lights (side by side) on the central reservation, the r/h set being for drivers to turn right after the omcoming traffic is waiting on 'red'.
    It's amazing how often, when the l/h set goes to 'green', a waiting driver sets off and turns right against the red light. And that is when the oncoming traffic also gets the 'green' light.

    A similar arrangement on the opposite end of the town doesn't suffer these driving errors, because the set of lights controlling the r/h turn are located on the far side of the junction, and the 'green' is a right-pointing arrow.

  3. #13
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    Oct 2007
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    Middlesex
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    We have a double set of lights locally, where one set is for straight ahead, and one for right turns. Although the right-turn set is often ignored by people using the lane as an overtaking lane. Setting off straight across when the forward lights turn green.

  4. #14
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    Oct 2007
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    Plymouth
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    Actually the particular junction I have a problem with is a dual carriageway "T" junction with a straight on and a left turn. The straight on has a repeater but the left turn does not.
    I am wondering if the "straight on" repeater means DEFINATELY stop and the left turn might be interpreted as "MAYBE DEFINATELY" stop, because a lot of motorists just turn left there through a red light. No conflicting traffic so no harm done. Infact there should be a left filter there.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by chopper jockey View Post
    Actually the particular junction I have a problem with is a dual carriageway "T" junction with a straight on and a left turn. The straight on has a repeater but the left turn does not.
    I am wondering if the "straight on" repeater means DEFINATELY stop and the left turn might be interpreted as "MAYBE DEFINATELY" stop, because a lot of motorists just turn left there through a red light. No conflicting traffic so no harm done. Infact there should be a left filter there.
    A red light means stop: there are no 'definitelys' or 'maybes'. The motorists turning left are committing an offence - up to 1,000 fine and 3 points or a discretionary ban.

  6. #16
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    I think I can see chopper jockey's dilemma. My interpretation would be that, if there is no traffic signal before entering the junction, then turning right may be permissible because the drivers have not actually passed through a red light. This, however, would not explain how a right-turn should be negotiated; would a driver then wait for the signal on the opposite side of the junction to turn green? Which would serve no purpose unless the oncoming traffic got a 'red'. And a driver turning right would also not have passed through the red light anyhow. If there is not a set of signals before the junction, then there jolly well should be, in which case that on the opposite side of the junction would then definitely be a simple repeater light.
    As I said previously, traffic planners are not infallable.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by chopper jockey View Post
    Actually the particular junction I have a problem with is a dual carriageway "T" junction with a straight on and a left turn. The straight on has a repeater but the left turn does not.
    I am wondering if the "straight on" repeater means DEFINATELY stop and the left turn might be interpreted as "MAYBE DEFINATELY" stop, because a lot of motorists just turn left there through a red light. No conflicting traffic so no harm done. Infact there should be a left filter there.
    A left filter would seem sensible but it would depend on the lights directing traffic from the opposite direction. Is there a right turn filter? The arrangement may also allow pedestrians time to cross the side road.

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