All you need to know about adding named drivers to your insurance policy

Adding a named driver to your car insurance policy is easy to do - and may end up saving you money, too. 

When taking out car insurance, you will usually be given the option of adding a named driver to your policy. It might be worth considering this option carefully - let’s take a closer look at how to add a named driver, how the process works, and how it can affect your policy.

Despite how it might sound, adding a named driver (a second driver) to your car insurance policy won’t automatically mean you’ll be paying more for your insurance - it’s not like paying for “double the cover”- but it could land you with a lower premium. It really does depend on your circumstances.


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What is a named driver?

Simply, it’s another person that you add to your existing car insurance policy, someone you allow permission to drive the insured vehicle. This means that if this person is driving the car, he or she will be insured in the case of an accident, and covered if there is any damage to the vehicle. The named driver will have the same level of insurance cover as you, the main driver, however if the additional driver causes an accident whilst driving your car, it will be your no claims discount that’s affected if you need to make a claim.


Who can be added as a named driver?

Technically anyone you choose to add can be a named driver - partner, spouse, family member or friend. It could be a parent adding a son or daughter to their car insurance, or someone adding their spouse - a wife adding a husband, or vice versa. If you're married or live together, you may want to add each other as named drivers so both of you can drive both cars.


How much does adding a named driver cost?

If you chose to add a named driver to an existing policy partway through the year, you might have to pay an admin fee to your insurer to make this amendment. In addition, adding a named driver to your policy may affect your annual premium and this is largely down to the risk profile of the individual you are adding. It could take your premium down, or in the case of adding a young driver, potentially increase your premium. 


Information about the named driver

When adding a named driver to either a new policy or an existing one, you’ll need to provide some details about that driver. Usually, those details will be basic: full name, address, date of birth, and so on. You might also need to provide details of occupation and any driving offences, accidents or convictions. If the named driver has any motoring convictions, don’t be surprised if adding them increases the cost of your insurance policy.


Can adding a named driver save me money?

It can, but it’s not guaranteed, as making changes to your insurance policy could always increase your premium cost. It could save you money if you’re a young driver and you add a parent to your policy, because a more experienced driver has access to the vehicle and may drive it on occasion – this may reduce the overall risk in the eyes of your insurer. It’s worth noting however, an experienced motorist who adds a young or new driver to their policy might see an increase.

We included adding a named driver to our list of 30 money-saving motoring tips and noted it as a method of reducing the cost of insurance for new drivers.


How often can a named driver drive the car?

Here’s where you need to be careful. Being the main driver and the named driver does not mean the same thing. The named driver should only be driving that car occasionally, not regularly or permanently. If, for example, a parent includes their son or daughter on their car insurance policy, but their son or daughter drives the car most of or all the time, this could be considered an illegal practice. This is known as fronting and is considered a type of car insurance fraud.


What is temporary car insurance?

Temporary car insurance could be a useful option if you want to add another driver to your policy for a limited period only, instead of for the duration of the full year. For example, if you have a son or daughter who is away at university, but returns for the summer holiday and may need to drive the family car now and again, temporary car insurance ensures they are covered for a specified period.

RAC Temporary Car Insurance is flexible and starts from as little as just one day - get a quote and tailor your insurance cover here.

Learn more about car insurance with the RAC here.