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Thread: registration plates/international codes.

  1. #1
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    Default registration plates/international codes.

    Someone regularly visits our next door neighbour in a van. The rear registration plate is white with black characters, which consist of two numbers, two letters, and four numbers, with hyphens between. To me, this is a French number plate, yet the Euro code on the plate say IRL, which is Ireland.

    This puzzles me. Any ideas?

  2. #2
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    That is indeed how the Irish do their number plates. Here in North Wales we see many of them on a daily basis as we are close to Holyhead, where the ferry goes to and from Dublin.

    The French number plate always ends with exactly 2 numbers (between 01 and 95) representing the département the car is from. The numbers of the départements are (with a handful of exceptions) decided by alphabetical order: 01 = Ain, 95 = Val-d'Oise, etc. When moving house in France, if you move between départments (roughly similar in size to our counties), you also have to change your car number plate to a number plate that ends in the correct two numbers of the départements you live in.

    Although there are aspects of France and French life that seem very chaotic, the country is in fact extremely maticulously organised geographically! The same goes for postcodes - always 5 numbers, the first two numbers always being those of the département. E.g. Lyon is in the "Rhône" département, which is number 69, so all residents' cars from there end in 69, and all their postcodes begin in 69, then three random numbers.
    Last edited by 98selitb; 19-03-09 at 14:47.

  3. #3
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    That's interesting, I didn't realise that Ireland had taken on a similar arrangement to france for car registration plates. I have a nephew who lives in France, so I am aware of their registration plates having to be for a particular "department".

    Also, French number plates have to be riveted to the vehicle body. Someone on another forum, who also lives in France, recently told how a dealership had riveted the plate on the rear of his VW Touran, and gone straight through the red folding warning triangle that is stowed in a cover inside the tailgate. When he undid the two velcro holding straps, he wondered why the triangle refused to budge!

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    I thought Irish plates were made up of 3 letters followed by 4 numbers, and that French front plates were yellow?

    That bit about the triangle sounds just like the French
    Cheers, Smudger.

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    Just been looking on Wikipedia and it seems that, if the article is true, France is bringing in a brand-new number plate system on 15/04/2009, with which the département number has less importance.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_...tration_plates

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by 98selitb View Post
    Just been looking on Wikipedia and it seems that, if the article is true, France is bringing in a brand-new number plate system on 15/04/2009, with which the département number has less importance.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_...tration_plates
    They have been talking about this for years. It is typical of France, They talk about it and put it on the back burner for another day.

    I know someone who lives in France and his still got his French number plates secured with screws after many years!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowball View Post
    That's interesting, I didn't realise that Ireland had taken on a similar arrangement to france for car registration plates. I have a nephew who lives in France, so I am aware of their registration plates having to be for a particular "department".
    The Irish plate have been like this for a long while. The first numbers are the year of registration, The letters denote the area and the last numbers denote the number of the car at time of registration. So if it was 99 xx 900 it would be the 900th car registered in that area in 1999.

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    Quote Originally Posted by smudger879n View Post
    That bit about the triangle sounds just like the French
    I know plenty of garages/mechanics here in the UK that are capable of this incompetence.

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    Angry UK Plates

    Quote Originally Posted by MrDanno View Post
    I know plenty of garages/mechanics here in the UK that are capable of this incompetence.
    And I have seen plenty that aren't even level! (Not to mention the pi**ocks who put coloured screw heads in inappropriately to make a 'word')!!

  10. #10
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    For anyone who's interested in the finer intricacies of number plates, there is an absolutely enormous section on it on Wikipedia by someone who either has a great passion or has a lot of time on their hands! There are very detailed profiles and histories for number plates of almost every country in the world. Just type "vehicle registration plate".

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