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Thread: intensive driving courses

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    Default intensive driving courses

    I am thinking of taking an intensive driving course and would be glad of some advice.There are a couple of driving schools advertising a week course of shared driving,this means there will be two learner drivers in the car with the same instructor.

    What they claim is that after you drive for about an hour and then take a break,watching someone else learning to drive helps you to learn quicker,i would be grateful for any thoughts on this method of learning to drive.

  2. #2
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    Sep 2007
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    Bristol
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    Default

    I would personally avoid, there is a reason that most major driving schools will not offer this service.

    I won't go into too much detail, but untill recently my partner worked for a major driving school, and the statistics with regards to pass rates for these courses ARE really rather shocking.

    I'd also be careful of any school offering to take two pupils in the vehicle at once, At the end of the day it can be off putting going through something as daunting as a driving lesson on an unfamilier road as it is, especially to a relative novice. If you add another learner sat in the back staring into the mix I personally can imagine it being very off putting. The whole "two pupils in a car" thing is something again avoided by many big schools, and IIRC can be illegal to boot (although don't quote me on that)

    Seriously, It'll probably cost less to do it properly.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    12

    Default

    Sounds like a money making scam to me they get double the money for the same amount of work.
    I am not a fan of the intensive course, have found that it does not give the same grounding and knowledge that structured learning can give over a number of weeks, this gives many more different driving conditions.
    Also when booking don't just ask a price, ask your mates for recommendations, the cheap one are normally cheap for a reason, and some only do 45mins where as most do 1 hour so the price may seem cheap but in the long run costs you a lot more.

  4. #4
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    Nov 2007
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    Liverpool
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    Default

    Hi, it is a money making scam, my brother-in-law done an intensive a few years ago and failed..he paid £800 for it , its a lot of money to waste in one week of tripe. I mean whats the rush???..your bound to make mistakes. Please Avoid

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    12

    Smile

    Hi just checking to see how the driving is going, did you do the intensive course, if you are still ooking to learn I would ask around to see who get recommended to most, this is your best method of choosing an instructor, don't go for the one with the biggest advert, if they need to advertise a lot it may mean they don't get many people recommending them, also once you have passed your test it is a good idea to look into doing the Pass Plus scheme, it can save you £100s on your insurance. All the best and let us know how things are going.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    18

    Default

    I always avoided intensive courses. Even when BSM tried to sell me 3 hours a day or something stupid I said no. The girl at the BSM office told me they knew best at the time, but I believe it was all about money.

  7. #7
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    Sep 2007
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    12

    Default

    Please remember that all the Driving Instructor can do is their best in a short space of time, as with everything, everyone learns at different rates, so for 1 person the intensive may be a waste of lessons if they progress quicker than expected but for many the intensive course will not be enough driving experience and they will not be properly prepared for the test and fail. This then dents their confidence and costs them nearly £50 in test fees.
    Also if they are a good instructor they probably won't have the space to fit you in for an intensvie course, as they will already be running a full pad!
    My advice is find a recommended instructor and follow their advice.

  8. #8
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    Sep 2007
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    Bristol
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    Quote Originally Posted by franco View Post
    I always avoided intensive courses. Even when BSM tried to sell me 3 hours a day or something stupid I said no. The girl at the BSM office told me they knew best at the time, but I believe it was all about money.
    To the best of my knowledge BSM don't offer "intensive courses" it's one of the things the sales staff learn in the first few days of training.

    They do, however have a bit of a nasty habit of answering your question "How much an hour are driving lessons in my area" with a huge list of products, test fees and several block bookings of lessons (offering a huuuge package that you didn't ask for.) Then asking how that sounds (it often totals £1000+) before working downwards through block bookings etc

    Took me ages to book my first couple of lessons with BSM as a result, as I only had funds available to pay for a couple of lessons (they didn't think to check that...) but as the standard of instruction has been excellent it was worth the hassle..

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    South Wales
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    5

    Default

    Hi there, I work for a large driving school - when you mention "intensive driving course" it all depends what you class as intensive (i.e, 2/3 weeks?)

    let me explain a few things.

    First of all on average each driving intructor already has around 15 pupils, I recommend to make good progress you should have atleast 1 2hr session per week. What you have to bear in mind is intructors have to look after their exiting customers.

    On average people pass between 30/40 hours, the DSA (Driving Standards Agency) Statistics show that for every year of your life, you require 2 hours of tuition (as a guideline) suggesting the older you are it may take longer to pass.

    Now then, if you come across anyone offering 1/2 week courses - remember this:

    All theory tests are managed by a company called pearson vue (a third party company acting on behalf of the DSA) and practical tests directly via the DSA. Every organisation / Individual can only book a test by only calling 0870 010137, online www.dsa.gov.uk or by sening in an application form in via the postal service.

    There is usually a waiting list of about 2 weeks for the theory test and as for the driving test at the moment approx 1 month, however you MIGHT be lucky to find a cancellation test - but there is NEVER a guarantee

    REMEMBER: you cannot book your driving test until you pass your theory test!

    (THEORY TEST IS 2 PARTS, Questions and Hazard Perception)

    So lets assume you book your theory test for about 2 weeks time, which to be honest makes sense because you can give yourself enough time to revise (Remember is £28.50 a shot!) and theres a pot of just over 1000! questions of which on the day you need you need to score 43 or more out of 50 on the question side - You also need to practice for the hazard perception test also! (you need to score 44 out of 75 or more to pass the HP test)

    during this time you could have had spread out your lessons nicely so you can have time to think about what you did each lesson (you'll be suprised how much you improve just by thinking about what you didnt do so well on, last lesson) and more importantly you are giving yourself the opportunity to gain experience as no 2 days on the road are the same - this will make you safer and more experienced by far! better than doing 7 hours a day for example.

    Once you have your theory test under your belt your intructor should know you well enough to decide how quickly you are progressing towards your driving test or tell you how many lessons you will have to fit in before your test (if you have gone ahead and booked the practical test, without first of all discussing it with your intructor)

    Hope some of this information prooves useful, GOOD LUCK!

    PS! If you have not already applied for your provisional, there is plenty you can do to get started . . .

    1 - Start revising for the theory test
    2 - BSM have a driving simulator, I did this when I learnt with them 3 years ago - a six hour course which introduces the basics of driving - moving off, stopping and much more - this can be done without a provisional as its done in one of their local centres.
    Last edited by geraintl84; 20-12-07 at 23:51.

  10. #10
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    Sep 2007
    Location
    Scotland
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    Default

    Do you think that more emphasis is put on "how to pass the driving test" as opposed to "learning to drive" as such? I only ask as I see some basic mistakes being made by newly qualified drivers. For example, reverse parking into a space, poor positioning on the road while turning right, miss judging the speed of on coming traffic (especially at junctions and roundabouts)

    Some new drivers have that green "P" on their car, (indicating they have just passed their test) which is a good thing, as I always give them more space so as not to hassle or worry them. It takes a few years for someone to build up the experience they need on today's busy roads, mind you some folk take to driving more naturally. I just think that learning to "pass the test" might leave some new drivers with a false sense of confidence.
    Cheers, Smudger.

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