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Thread: What are you Doing Today.

  1. #3741
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    Yes, used to do this with my grandad's Rover 90. He was too tight to buy new batteries. Can picture him now in his early 60s raincoat (bit like Harold Wilson's) and wearing his Trilby winding the starting handle.

  2. #3742
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    Quote Originally Posted by Motman View Post
    My sister had the same problem with her X5. Sometimes it would crank over, sometimes it wouldn’t. I checked the charge (was ok) and she had a new proper battery fitted so in the end she bought one of those jump packs - tiny little thing about the size of three packets of fags and it worked a treat. In the end she bought another car and gave that one to her daughter. When it wouldn’t start one morning she got a dealer round and px'd it!
    So, with fingers crossed, went out this morning and turned the key in the bus. Don't think the starter knew what had happened, it spun so fast. Phew...

  3. #3743
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    Reminds me of something that happened when I first started driving lorries back in the 60s. I had a 12 ton Ford Thames Trader which I took home on Monday evening for an early start on Tuesday. It was very cold and frosty and the darn thing wouldn't start, so I walked down the road to a garage that was just opening up for the day.

    The mechanic had a slave battery on a trolley and he wheeled it up to give mine a jump start, but it wasn't fully charged and was only just able to turn the engine. The mechanic took the leads off the lorry battery and connected the two batteries in series instead of parallel. As with Hometune's bus, the starter whizzed round and I was away.

    I don't think running a 12-volt starter on 24 volts is a good idea generally though, and I am sure that a modern truck would suffer a terminal breakdown if you tried it today.

  4. #3744
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    Jul 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by Santa View Post
    Reminds me of something that happened when I first started driving lorries back in the 60s. I had a 12 ton Ford Thames Trader which I took home on Monday evening for an early start on Tuesday. It was very cold and frosty and the darn thing wouldn't start, so I walked down the road to a garage that was just opening up for the day.

    The mechanic had a slave battery on a trolley and he wheeled it up to give mine a jump start, but it wasn't fully charged and was only just able to turn the engine. The mechanic took the leads off the lorry battery and connected the two batteries in series instead of parallel. As with Hometune's bus, the starter whizzed round and I was away.

    I don't think running a 12-volt starter on 24 volts is a good idea generally though, and I am sure that a modern truck would suffer a terminal breakdown if you tried it today.
    Fords of that era were notorious for poor cold starting. Especially in Scotland, where it got very cold.

    My dad had an Anglia Van which was dreadful. Later, at work, we had a 65 Ford Thames 30 cwt pickup. On frosty mornings there was simply no chance of it starting. We normally managed to get our Fiat diesel forklift started, then used that to push-start our Fordson Major tractor, and then the pickup.

    And when you tell young people today ....

  5. #3745
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    Jan 2017
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    I suppose it's similar to how an older car will tolerate the wrong fuel to some extent - (e.g. an litre or so of petrol in a diesel) whereas modern vehicles, with tightly set emissions systems, may struggle.

  6. #3746
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    I did my apprenticeship at a Vauxhall/Bedford dealer and on Bedford TK trucks, the cold start was a type of heated coil, a bit like a cigarette lighter that glowed and then raw diesel was dripped onto it which caused a flame which was then sucked into the engine to help it start. A few years later I went out to pick up a VW Golf diesel that wouldn’t start in the cold - it needed new glow plugs but to get it started, I took off the air filter cover and element and built a small fire out of newspaper in the intake manifold/filter housing, cranked it over and hey presto, it started. 😁

  7. #3747
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    In the winter of 1963, I was parked for the night in a layby somewhere in Northumbria. It was so cold that I had left the engine running all night so I didn't have a problem starting. When I looked outside I saw a row of trucks and it looked as if half of them were on fire.

    Diesel will precipitate wax at low temperatures and drivers who had not taken the precaution of adding paraffin to their fuel had to warm the diesel tank to get the engine running; a simple way of doing that was to light a fire under it.

    Sadly for them; as soon as they got the engine started and drove off, the water in their radiators would freeze and they would not be going far.

  8. #3748
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    Today I took the Evoque in to work and fitted a new pair of front tyres after my little accident a few nights ago. Pretty pleased as they were measuring 3.2 mm on the outer treads so were just about due to be changed. The rears still had 6mm on them (not bad after 25,000 miles) whilst the new ones came with 9mm of tread. While it was in I drilled a hole in the bottom of my rear axle casing, drained the oil, helicoiled it and refilled it after fitting a magnetic drain plug.

  9. #3749
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    Helicoil expert now eh? So you can teach an old dog new tricks......

  10. #3750
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    Don't know about new tricks, Hometune. Helicoil inserts were designed in the 1930's to meet the demands of the aircraft industry.

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