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Thread: Crisis? What Crisis?

  1. #1
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    Default Crisis? What Crisis?

    According to a new report from the RAC Foundation, policy makers should look to the 1970s and not repeat mistakes made at the time of the 1973-1975 Energy Crisis.

    The report claims that the radical propositions currently being considered will not help solve Britian's transport problems - but what do you think?

    Please click on the link below to read the full story and then tell us your views:

    http://www.fleetdirectory.co.uk/flee...s-what-crisis/

  2. #2
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    Quite interesting, but I think, completely wrong. I was working on motorcycles during the Energy Crisis of the early '70s, and we were selling them hand-over-fist, could not get enough commuter models (step-throughs and mopeds), to satisfy demand. The majority of drivers affected by fuel problems, would rather face the weather than public transport. I moved house in Winter of '74, to a house two minutes from the Underground, and as my place of work was next to a station four stops down the line, decided to try it out. It was an absolute joke, with cancelled trains blamed on frozen points,signal failure and drivers going sick. I gave up after two weeks.
    *For those of you who remember the three-day week, we were only able to stay open because we were using generators for heating and lighting.*

  3. #3
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    Yea! I remember the 3 day week and fuel crisis back in the 70s. Thing is, its a lot harder to change over to 2 wheels these days.

    You have to attend safety courses and the like, where as back then, you just bought your small bike/scooter and a crash hat, and away you went using your car license, not now

  4. #4
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    I remember the 70s because I got a speeding fine for doing more than 50 on the open road i.e. 70 limit normally but reduced to save fuel.
    There was a trend to smaller cars and as Rolebama says, motorbikes too. The report is definitely correct in saying that the government has not learned from it though. Nor have car manufacturers who continue to make the likes of monster Range Rovers, Mercedes, BMW, Porsche etc. What is this all about?
    The 'normal' motoring public round here seem to be buying smaller cars like the Toyota Yaris presumably with help from the scrappage scheme, and that must be a good thing.
    If you look at the cars that General Motors were producing until recently, all gas guzzlers and now rejected by an American population that is waking up to the fact oil is not infinite, it is obvious they never learned anything from the 70s - they make the Hummer, the most inefficient thing on the road and a Chinese company has just bought it. So it will continue to be marketed even though oil is running out.
    The road system is going to deteriorate rapidly as cuts in transport budgets are definitely going to be a priority for a bankrupt government, so expect more potholes, roadworks to patch up life-expired surfaces and more delays as new road building programs are cut.
    In short, nothing has been learned.

  5. #5
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    Hometune's comment about bankrupt Govt reminded me of my local Borough lost £76million when the Icelandic bank went under. When asked why they had 'invested' the money in a foreign bank instead of the road infrastructure, their answer was that they were 'trying to stave off the impact of future cost increases.' No thought of doing it today at today's prices!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hometune View Post
    Nor have car manufacturers who continue to make the likes of monster Range Rovers, Mercedes, BMW, Porsche etc.

    The 'normal' motoring public round here seem to be buying smaller cars like the Toyota Yaris presumably with help from the scrappage scheme, and that must be a good thing.

    The road system is going to deteriorate rapidly as cuts in transport budgets are definitely going to be a priority for a bankrupt government, so expect more potholes, roadworks to patch up life-expired surfaces and more delays as new road building programs are cut.
    In short, nothing has been learned
    .
    Perhaps, instead of penalising the large cars, the government should encourage us to all go for off-roaders, and forget about road maintenance.
    Would the difference in increased fuel consumption be as costly or more environmentally unfriendly than a massive roadworks programme and the associted heavy plant that goes with it?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowball View Post
    Perhaps, instead of penalising the large cars, the government should encourage us to all go for off-roaders, and forget about road maintenance.
    Would the difference in increased fuel consumption be as costly or more environmentally unfriendly than a massive roadworks programme and the associted heavy plant that goes with it?
    Brilliant, Snowball! Many of us here have come to that conclusion already! Lot more large 4x4s in evidence - some new double cabs but a goodly number of rather older Landies and the like.

    As far as I can see very little has been learned from the 70's fuel crisis. I remember the three day week - I commuted to London and my employer's paid for me to stay in a hotel up there some weeks because our electric trains were so unreliable. I pooled my petrol ration with my hubby to be who had to use a car.

    Possibly the differences between then and now is that population is more mobile; there's more singletons and our public transport infrastructure hasn't improved much from what I hear and the occasional use I can make of it - except Edinburgh buses!! Such flexibility of population moving for jobs and schools, etc. means less cohesion in a lot of places so a lot of folks just don't each other and are mistrustful of car-sharing. Shift hours can vary more dramatically, too. T

    The other thing is that we have this anthropogenic global warming hysteria driving the world's politicians. I don't think it's a bad thing to reduce waste and energy consumption - saves the individual money! - but, if we don't keep our road system up to the job, how are these monster turbines going to be shifted into place? :-)

  8. #8
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    First and foremost, Global Warming, and the fears we are supposed to have nightmares about, is producing an army of non-productive pontificators; drawing huge salaries but running around like headless chickens.

    They are amassing vast amounts of information, but have no idea as to how they are going to use it. They are coming up with vaious "green" solutions, some of which are so much in conflict with each other that they will never agree on a strategic plan for the future. And nothing will significantly change by their efforts, apart from increased taxation. As a result, plans to combat global warming will always be "for the future", and, as always, industrial technology will remain the factor that brings us through.
    But governments and their entourage will never admit that we don't really need them.

  9. #9
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    Do I detect a little cynicism there snowball?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by wagolynn View Post
    Do I detect a little cynicism there snowball?
    Wow, does it show? It's difficult not to resort to extracting the proverbial when the first thing that springs to mind is, "Yeah, we've heard it all before!"

    Can hardly wait until, when the failures become so blatantly obvious, they come up with some excuse as to why, as always, it is never their fault. Probably blame some galaxial change billions of miles away, that mere mortals like us have no hope of proving one way or the other.
    There I go again; tut, tut, must curb this cynicism.

    Regards, Snowball.

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