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Thread: driving whilst already on roundabout

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
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    Default driving whilst already on roundabout

    hi
    Would appreciate your thoughts on this scenario. I am approaching a roundabout, I wish to go straight on, I approach in the left hand lane which is marked by arrows as Left and Straight on. I give way to the right and wait until it is clear to pull out. I pull out when nothing is coming. I proceed round the roundabout in the left hand lane, with the intention of exiting straight on, second exit. As I near the first exit, on the left, I see that there are two lanes exiting on this left exit. The lanes are separated by long dashes. I have to cross these dashes in order to proceed round. When I get halfway across the first exit, just after crossing the dashed lines, a speeding vehicle shoots across in front of me from my right. The vehicle was not there when I entered the roundabout, and is speeding. The insurance company tell me that because I crossed the dashed lines, I entered his lane. The insurance company say that I should have stopped on the roundabout to give way. The online highway code doesnt seem to give provide any clarification. What is the correct thing to do?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
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    Default

    Hello there, sorry to read of your problem, I am no expeert but my thoughts are as follows:

    First the speeding vehicle bit is irrelevant, firstly, because if you had time to see it was speeding you could have taken evasive action and secondly it is only your opinion that it was speeding. I am unable to work out the rest about a left exit with two lanes and lines on the road. I cannot think of where any lines might over rule the priority you had by being first onto the roundabout. See
    http://www.direct.gov.uk/prod_consum.../dg_070563.pdf
    I could not see any lines that give any priority to traffic entering a roundabout. Did you send your insurance company a drawing or photographs of the roundabout? I think, they may have misunderstood your description of what happened.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    Scotland
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    Default

    Roundabouts and junctions are always gray areas when it comes to legal battles with insurance companies.
    That along with the fact that some people are prepared to lie through their teeth to police and insurance companies, to get off the hook when they know that they were at fault!

    So often I have seen the innocent driver being given 50/50 or even blamed for the accident

  4. #4
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    Apr 2007
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    I don't know if I have got this right, but sometimes there is a lefthand lane that is marked in such a way that anyone using it does not have to give way to traffic from the right, and a broken white line depicts this; this is what I believe is meant by "long dashes".
    In such a situation, traffic coming from the right (in this case you) would not cross over (to the left) into that lane.

    This is the only situation I can think of where traffic from your left would have precedence on a roundabout; subject to there being no othersigns to the contrary.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    London
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    14

    Default merges at roundabouts

    I too had difficulty determining the situation as described.

    The situation in which I see lane distinctions which vary the procedure of giving way to traffic on your right at a roundabout is this (using the clock-face as a guide) :-

    On exit from the 6 o'clock road (dual carriageway) into the 9 o'clock road, where the latter is also a dual carriageway, the road can be marked by solid lines with chevrons which are wide apart at the beginning but narrow to a point a short short distance along the road. This allows traffic coming from the 6 road and traffic coming around the roundabout from elsewhere to enter the 9 road together in separate lanes.

    I doubt however that the separating chevrons are within the "outer circle" of the roundabout I.E. traffic on the inside lane in road 6 should have the ability to go round to the 12 O'Clock Road in the outer lane.without crossing them.

    Were these the circumstances?


    For those who may have entered the roundabout you get to after leaving the southbound A2 at the Bluewater turnoff will recognise the scenario!

    cheers

  6. #6
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    Apr 2009
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    But the more lanes there are on the round about the more lanes you will have to cross. Say you were to do a 360 around the roundabout as you leave you would cross all the lanes. Or have I misunderstood, I am very good at that.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    London
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    Default

    It has now become the practice for some road authorities, where possible, to have lane indicator lines on the roundabouts themselves. They differentiate the lines for each route around the roundabout by varying the thickness of the lines. In thses cases the lines do cross one another.

    Pity there are no graphics on this site!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Oxford
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    I agree with the previous post. The lines which were crossed seem to be lane markings for the junction to the left. If that junction had priority then the driver should have been aware of a Give Way sign and double dashed lines as at the approach to most roundabouts and Give Ways. One should try to be very pedantic regarding the description of the road markings and be able to identify differences of hazard lines, centre of road lines, double white lines and so on. A refresher course on the Highway Code is always useful!

    Tony

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
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    At the risk of repeating myself, the French have a mandatory speed limit of 50 kph (30 mph) on roundabouts. To me, this makes commonsense. A large 6-junction roundabout near to us has a 50 mph speed limit, and collisions are frequent.
    What chance does a driver strange to an area have, if he/she happens to get into the wrong lane? It must be a regular occurrence for a driver to be looking for a specific location, and to be travelling a bit more slowly in the process. It should also be normal for drivers to be aware of, and expect, these situations. Yet most drivers seem to plough on regardless, maintaining the highest possible speed and resenting anyone who causes the need for them to ease back on the accelerator.

    Add to these the idiot drivers who signal too early, indicating "left" before reaching the exit which they don't intend to take, and then witter on about about their "right-of-way" being blocked by the driver whose righthand side they have just crashed into.

    I almost had a collision on the A5 a couple of weeks ago because of one of these clots. Fortunately for me, I had somehow felt that he was coming further round the island, and stopped. But the driver behind me, who should also seen the lefthand indicator, probably assumed that I would be going straight onto the roundabout. Luckily, he managed to brake hard before a shunt occurred, and glared at me as if I had done something wrong.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
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    I think that you have to except that a flashing indicator means, my car has winking yellow lights and they work, can you see the pretty lights? Consequently, I ignore them and use the vehicle body language to determine which way it is probably going.

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