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Thread: Do traders not have to give a 3 month warranty if you buy a seperate one?

  1. #11
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    It is six months:
    Under the Sale of Goods Act and Sale and Supply of Goods to Consumer Regulations
    Refunds

    If a car is defective, unsafe or otherwise doesn't conform to its description, the Sale of Goods Act and the Sale and Supply of Goods to Consumers Regulations (SOGA/SSGCR) give you rights across Europe to a refund, particularly if the fault occurs soon after buying, but also if there are problems a bit later on and there are unreasonable delays in getting the vehicle repaired or replaced. It's still best to complain about problems as soon as possible.

    Repair and replacement

    When you buy a defective car, repairs must not cause you significant inconvenience and the seller must bear all the costs. You can require the seller to reduce the purchase price if repairs or other remedies are unrealistic in a reasonable period of time.
    Note that if you buy through an auction that you have or could have attended in person, your rights to refunds, repairs and replacements are more limited. These limitations don't apply to internet and telephone auctions.

    Warranties and guarantees

    After any warranty or guarantee period, or after six months, you might have to prove that any defect existed before you purchased. Guarantees are transferable to subsequent buyers.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rolebama View Post
    The law is right, and the law says you have a warranty on any second hand car bought from a dealer. It is quite true that they do not have to be 'offered' as it is given by law and there is no way a dealer can opt out of this situation.
    Its not a warranty,its your legal rights.

    As I understand it the below applies (I do not have time to check this)

    If a fault appears within 6 months the onus is on the dealer to prove that fault was not there when sold.
    After 6 months its upto the buyer to prove it was there.

  3. #13
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    Loony, I would argue that it is a warranty. Especially after reading Santa's post above. The way I see it, it is a legally enforceable warranty.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rolebama View Post
    The law is right, and the law says you have a warranty on any second hand car bought from a dealer. It is quite true that they do not have to be 'offered' as it is given by law and there is no way a dealer can opt out of this situation.
    If one buys a Government surplus vehicle direct from the Governments agent then in that case the vehicles are usually sold expressly with NO warranty.

  5. #15
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    Some car auctions have a "sold as seen" clause, which of course means that there in No warranty of any kind for the vehicle you are buying.

    Others offer a very short warranty, but I have no experience at all with that, as I've never bought at a car auction.

  6. #16
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    "sold as seen" may not be enough to allow a trader to escape their legal responsibilities. They would need to be much more specific and say that the vehicle was not roadworthy and they shouldn't allow it to be driven off their site.

    Note that if you buy through an auction that you have – or could have – attended in person, your rights to refunds, repairs and replacements are more limited. These limitations don't apply to internet and telephone auctions.
    Last edited by Santa; 25-07-13 at 23:40.

  7. #17
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    Buying from an auction or Govt surplus is not buying through a dealership. Which is why dealers use auctions to get rid of some of the used cars they take in part exchange to avoid the cost of having to warranty them. I know that Govt sales used to be done by either auction, or a 'tender' basis to avoid having to give warranties. I would assume they still use a similar system or systems.

  8. #18
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    When I worked for the NHS, I sold many vehicles through auctions, ranging from knackered old ambulances to four year old Fiestas with 25,000 miles on the clock.

    With the Fiestas - given the up front discount, the low mileage, and high inflation at the time; I pretty much sold them for what I paid.

  9. #19
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    Quote............" knackered old ambulances"

    Aye! I've driven a few of them.

  10. #20
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    At the time a new ambulance, without equipment cost around 18k. We sold them at six years old for 200 - 250.

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