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Thread: Automatic Driving Licence

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    Default Automatic Driving Licence

    Hi

    I have a licence but only for Automatics. Obviously, I can't drive manuals, but what about the semi-automatics - am I legally able to drive them or do they still count as manual transmission?

    Can't find anywhere with a definite answer

  2. #2
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    Mar 2008
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    Default

    I think i would contact DVLA at Swansea for an answer to this one..

  3. #3
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    Jan 2007
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    Default

    I would say if it has not got a clutch pedal it would be classed as an automatic,we have some vehicles that although you can change gear with a gear stick they have no clutch pedal and can be driven on an automatic licence although they are actually classed as a semi-automatic,i do believe that it does depend on the absence or not as the case may be of the clutch pedal as to wether it is or isnt an automatic.

  4. #4
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    Jan 2008
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    183

    Question semi-auto's

    Im 99.99999999999% certain that you can drive a semi-auto on an automatic licence.
    Just so you don't think I'm guessing - I'll qualify that statement.....
    Back in 1994 I took my automatic PCV test and did some bus driving whilst between jobs (and still do part-time to this day), and whilst most of the buses are fully automatic - some are semi-automatic and we were all told and expected to drive whichever bus was allocated each day.
    The bus company deliberately did not have any manual buses as too many of their drivers would not be able to drive them - which could potentially affect the service. I was and still do drive for the largest public transport company in the world, and so this type of issue is not taken lightly.
    I now have the full PCV licence - so I can drive coaches too if I want.

  5. #5
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    Jan 2007
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lonestranger View Post
    Im 99.99999999999% certain that you can drive a semi-auto on an automatic licence.
    Just so you don't think I'm guessing - I'll qualify that statement.....
    Back in 1994 I took my automatic PCV test and did some bus driving whilst between jobs (and still do part-time to this day), and whilst most of the buses are fully automatic - some are semi-automatic and we were all told and expected to drive whichever bus was allocated each day.
    The bus company deliberately did not have any manual buses as too many of their drivers would not be able to drive them - which could potentially affect the service. I was and still do drive for the largest public transport company in the world, and so this type of issue is not taken lightly.
    I now have the full PCV licence - so I can drive coaches too if I want.
    We are the same as you have just said at our depot,although they train on fully automatics they are able and expected to drive semi-automatics,they didnt train on manuals at the time as they were afraid many would leave for coach driving as most of or if not all at the time were manuals with a stick shift,that now seems to be out the window as most new coaches are now comming with fully auto boxes.

  6. #6
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    Default

    This is from the DT1 form given to DSA examiners and this is what the official guidelines state regarding automatic transmissions:

    <<
    6.8 VEHICLES WITH AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION
    A vehicle with automatic transmission is defined in regulations as `A vehicle in which the gear ratio between the engine and the wheels can be varied only by the use of the accelerator or brakes'. In general a vehicle without a manual clutch is regarded as an automatic.

    The following points of driving technique are common to all automatic systems:

    HANDBRAKE
    The handbrake should be applied for temporary stops, e.g. waiting at a red traffic light, a junction, or in a traffic hold-up, if they are likely to be of a long duration
    Short stops may not require the application of the handbrake
    The handbrake may need to be applied to prevent `creep'
    Faults committed in these cases should be recorded at Handbrake

    FOOTBRAKE AND ACCELERATOR
    The use of the right foot for both brake and accelerator pedals has considerable safety advantages. It is therefore recommended practice for normal driving, but is not necessarily applicable to disabled drivers. The use of the left foot on the brake pedal should not however be marked as a fault unless it involves the use of the footbrake against the accelerator
    The use of both feet when manoeuvring in a confined space is acceptable if carried out correctly, i.e. speed is properly adjusted so that no large throttle opening or heavy braking pressures are involved.
    Any fault should be recorded at footbrake and/or Accelerator, or in the 'control' box if it occurs in the reversing, reverse parking, or turn in the road exercise

    6.9 PARTICULAR DRIVING SYSTEMS

    FULLY AUTOMATIC SYSTEM
    This type has selector settings for forward and reverse, neutral and/or park. It also has settings which enable the driver to select and retain a particular gear ratio or range of gear ratios, e.g. to obtain engine braking when descending a steep hill, although gear changes are normally made automatically. Most automatics of this type enable the driver to make an immediate change into the lower gear, to obtain extra acceleration, by means of `kick down' or part throttle operation actuated by the accelerator pedal. In nearly all cases the selector lever is mounted on the floor or the steering column in the position normally occupied by the gear lever, but there are exceptions, e.g. a panel of press buttons on the facia.

    SEMI-AUTOMATIC SYSTEMS
    With these the driver has to select the gear required by movement of the gear lever as with a manually controlled gearbox, but there is no clutch pedal. For driving test and licensing purposes these vehicles are regarded as automatics.

    PRE-SELECTOR SYSTEMS
    In these the gear is selected, before it is required, by manual movement of a selector lever, which is normally mounted on the steering column. When required, the gear is engaged by a single depression and release of the gear-change pedal, which is situated where the clutch pedal would be on an orthodox transmission.

    6.10 `THE CLUTCH' AND `GUIDOSIMPLEX'
    These adaptations enable a vehicle to be driven in manual or automatic mode. The candidate can choose which mode to drive the vehicle in and if successful should be issued with the appropriate DSA10.
    Disabled candidates may use the vehicle for a test in automatic mode as a means of overcoming their disability. If successful, the candidate should be issued with a restricted licence in the usual way.

    6.11 CENTRIFUGAL CLUTCHES AND FREE-WHEEL DEVICES
    Vehicles fitted with these devices do not fall within the definition of vehicles with automatic transmission. The use of a free-wheel device or centrifugal clutch in addition to a pedal-operated clutch is at the discretion of the candidate.

    6.12 SUBARU `HILL HOLDER' CLUTCH
    The `hill holder' clutch is fitted to manual versions of the Subaru Legacy estate and saloon models. Drivers are advised that when stopping on an incline they should take their foot off the brake pedal while keeping the clutch pedal depressed, this automatically engages the `hill holder' which prevents the vehicle from rolling back. To move off the driver selects first gear, releases the clutch and drives on in the normal way.
    Note: If any doubt exist about whether a particular vehicle is a manual or automatic, advice should be sought from Technical Standards Branch at HQ. This enquiry should be made prior to the start of the test and the candidate informed of the decision before starting the practical drive.

    6.13 CITROEN XM PARKING BRAKE
    Citroen XMs are fitted with an `emergency and parking brake`. This brake is operated by the driver pushing in a control fitted under the offside face vent and depressing an additional foot pedal situated to the left of the clutch pedal on the manual model and to the left of the brake pedal on the automatic version. The parking brake is released by pulling out the control fitted on the dash.
    The emergency brake can be operated by applying the additional pedal, which will operate the brakes without power assistance. Drivers are advised not to drive with the release control pushed in when driving normally.
    >>

  7. #7
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    Mar 2008
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    Default

    Thanks for the response guys. Makes my options a lot clearer!

  8. #8
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    Talking Tired fingers

    phheewww..... that must've taken some typing

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    Talking

    Hey thanx for this forum i have been looking for guidelines regarding
    automatic transmission cars and if i could then drive a SEMI-AUTOMATIC
    car for ages...
    Last edited by DT1983; 10-03-11 at 17:12.

  10. #10
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    Default

    Welcome to the site DT1983, not really sure what your question is?

    If you passed your test in a gear shift car, then you can drive an Auto/or Semi/Auto car.

    But, if you passed in an Auto, then you can only drive an Auto, if that is what you meant?

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