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Thread: Petrol into diesel Discovery

  1. #21
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    Petrol in diesel engines isn't a big issue but the other way around is disastrous. Modern petrol engines are filled with gas-sensors and temperature probes that are very sensitive to their environment. I know someone who accidentally ran a petrol engine on diesel about 12 months ago. The engine hasn't run right since and that's after replacing lambda sensors, co2 sensors, ECU etc. They just don't seem to be able to get to the bottom of what the problem is.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qhunter View Post
    Petrol in diesel engines isn't a big issue but the other way around is disastrous.
    I am sorry but you are wrong petrol in any common rail diesel can be a serious problem-In any common rail diesel engine (anything from about 97 on) the pressures the fuel system work at are massive. Diesel contains a lubricant which gets washed away as soon as petrol is introduced into the fuel system-this will enable 'metal to metal' contact to take place in the High Pressure pump and potentially cause it to seize- I have seen this happen and its not pretty especially when the HP pump is driven by a timing chain!
    You are more likely to escape damage by putting diesel in a petrol car but that is not to say you may damage the catalytic converter........ very rare but can happen.........depends how long the car was driven.........
    Last edited by Sussex Patrol; 28-03-08 at 11:08.

  3. #23
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    Petrol is a spirit with absolutely no lubricating properties whatsoever. Diesel fuel is an oil, with lubricating properties. Petrol dilutes diesel. It's not rocket science to work out that any amount of petrol in diesel will effect lubrication properties. As I posted earlier, petrol will also cause pre-ignition in a diesel causing engine damage. So you could end up with a failed pump and a shot engine.

  4. #24
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    As Rolebama says, petrol will definitely wreck a diesel engine. In addition, the bearings of the turbo-charger rely on the lubricating qualities of diesel (also better known as heavy oil), and this unit will also be wrecked.

  5. #25
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    Post Do your research

    Quote Originally Posted by Qhunter View Post
    Petrol in diesel engines isn't a big issue but the other way around is disastrous. Modern petrol engines are filled with gas-sensors and temperature probes that are very sensitive to their environment. I know someone who accidentally ran a petrol engine on diesel about 12 months ago. The engine hasn't run right since and that's after replacing lambda sensors, co2 sensors, ECU etc. They just don't seem to be able to get to the bottom of what the problem is.
    Qhunter:- I can't believe what I've just read !!!
    As SussexPatrol has stated - petrol into diesel is a MASSIVELY bigger problem than the other way-round and can run into thousands of ££££'s to put right.
    Please make more effort to get your facts straight before putting them on a public forum where others may take your advise seriously

  6. #26
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    Lightbulb If the shape fits.....

    Quote Originally Posted by Rolebama View Post
    It wouldn't be that difficult to change the nozzles. Off the top of my head, I thought out 31mm sided triangular, 30mm square and 32mm round. Just a few mm difference would ensure you couldn't put wrong nozzle in.
    Remember when we were all kids, and we all used to play with a "shapo" or a similar toy - where you had to put the round peg in the round hole - the square peg in the square hole - the oval peg in the oval hole etc? You couldn't do it any other way as nothing would go into the wrong hole.
    It's such a simple problem to solve - remember They changed the nozzle size before back around 1990 when they introduced catalytic converters. You cannot put leaded petrol into a catalyst equipped car as the lead damages the catalyst..... So - they got around this problem by making the unleaded nozzle smaller so that a leaded nozzle simply wouldn't fit.
    Conclusion
    There simply is NO excuse for the government not to liase with the oil industry to address this problem, especially as Rolebama has also pointed out - It is such an easy problem to remedy.

  7. #27
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    The new Ford Mondeo has some type of system on the filler neck to prevent miss-fuelling-but I must admit I don't know how it works-I wonder if other manufacturers will follow??
    EDIT
    just had a gander on the Ford site
    Ford Easy Fuel


    The new Mondeo is the first production car to feature Ford’s award-winning Easy Fuel system.

    The system features a mis-fuelling inhibitor that can tell the difference between the fuel pump nozzle used for petrol and diesel and only accepts the right one for your car. So you’ll never experience diesel being added to a petrol tank or vice versa. And its capless design removes the risk of spilling fuel on your fingers – or worse, your clothes.
    Last edited by Sussex Patrol; 28-03-08 at 20:21.

  8. #28
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    My opinion (not advice) is based on events I've been a party to down the years. I've certainly seen more damage done to modern petrol engines by diesel than the other way around. That said, I've not heard of anyone 'petrolling' a common rail diesel. Let's be sensible about this, I'm not suggesting for one second that you continue using a vehicle once you've realised the wrong fuel is in it but what I'm saying is that in my experience the worst damage I've heard about has been diesel into petrol vehicles.

    And as for the notion that diesel fuel lubricates turbo bearings... oh please.

    It's not that many years ago, before heated fuel filters came into being, that hauliers would add a % of petrol to their diesel tanks in winter to try and prevent waxing. I know this to be fact, I used to work for such a firm.
    Last edited by Qhunter; 29-03-08 at 09:12.

  9. #29
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    Talking Do your Research 2

    Quote Originally Posted by Qhunter View Post
    My opinion (not advice) is based on events I've been a party to down the years. I've certainly seen more damage done to modern petrol engines by diesel than the other way around. That said, I've not heard of anyone 'petrolling' a common rail diesel. Let's be sensible about this, I'm not suggesting for one second that you continue using a vehicle once you've realised the wrong fuel is in it but what I'm saying is that in my experience the worst damage I've heard about has been diesel into petrol vehicles.

    And as for the notion that diesel fuel lubricates turbo bearings ... oh please.
    Yes - someone else who needs to do their homework before posting on a public forum..... otherwise incorrect and untrue statements can leave you looking like a bit of a wally.
    Perhaps Snowball would like to edit his last post before anyone else notices
    Last edited by lonestranger; 28-03-08 at 22:25.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rolebama View Post
    It wouldn't be that difficult to change the nozzles. Off the top of my head, I thought out 31mm sided triangular, 30mm square and 32mm round. Just a few mm difference would ensure you couldn't put wrong nozzle in.
    Probably the most common sense solution I've heard for this problem.

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