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Thread: Doctor Home visits England

  1. #1
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    Mar 2013
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    Default Doctor Home visits England

    I had been under the impression that people over 70 were entitled to home visits by their doctor. However, I now read that no one is entitled to a home visit. Has it ever been that over 70s were entitled to home visits ? if so when did it change ?

  2. #2
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    Apr 2012
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    From the Leaflet " It's Your Practice"

    http://www.nhs.uk/choiceintheNHS/You...eb_version.pdf
    Home visits
    If you are housebound or are too ill to visit the GP
    practice you can request a home visit. Some practices
    also offer home visits for carers which can help to
    overcome problems such as booking respite.
    You cannot insist that your GP visits you at home.
    Your GP will only visit you at home if they think that
    your medical condition requires it and will also decide
    how urgently a visit is needed.
    You can be visited at home by a community nurse if
    you are referred by your GP. You should also be visited
    at home by a health visitor if you have recently had
    a baby or if you are newly registered with a GP and
    have a child under five years.
    I am not sure that anyone was ever entitled to a home visit.

  3. #3
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    Mar 2013
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    Thank you for taking the time to post such an informative reply - much appreciated. A few people I know thought the same - I suspect a few years ago some political spin took on the appearance of reality. However, I won't start on about politicians.

  4. #4
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    We must be really lucky here in Scotland then, as my wife has had doctors visits at home for the past few years,ever since she became house bound.

  5. #5
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    Jul 2011
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    It's not luck, and it's not just Scotland!

    The NHS say "Your GP will only visit you at home if they think that
    your medical condition requires it ..."

    My wife is also housebound, in England, and has never had a problem getting a home visit when necessary. However, sometimes it isn't necessary and things can be resolved over the 'phone. It makes sense for the GP to have that flexibility.

  6. #6
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    I am now in my eightieth, and OH only 2 years behind. Never mind about home visits, we find it difficult to get an appointment within a reasonable time. Since the practice went on line, I get the impression that its main purpose is to keep you more isolated. Time past, you could arrange to see a particular doctor who you had seen in the past, and who was familiar with your health pattern. Now, doctors seem to be on a "passing through" basis, and every time you go on line, or book an appointment, the names of the doctors are different.
    A new medical centre is in its final stages, and our doctors' practice is to be moved, along with other surgeries, but the practices will, so I am told, remain independent of each other.
    A single reception desk, or separate reception areas once inside the building? No info is available, to us anyhow, regarding any administration integration. But it certainly looks like a good breeding ground for more chaos!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    Cool

    Quote Originally Posted by belucky22 View Post
    I had been under the impression that people over 70 were entitled to home visits by their doctor. However, I now read that no one is entitled to a home visit. Has it ever been that over 70s were entitled to home visits ? if so when did it change ?
    I am very nearly age 65. I think service was better thirty years ago.

    The NHS seems to treat everybody just like a customer for any other service such as GPO telephones or any Call centres, these days.

    Has Personal Service died?

  8. #8
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    Nothing gets better these days for the poor recipient of Services.

    Doctors and Nurses do not tell close family members information which they NEED in order to effectively "care" for babies or spouses.

  9. #9
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    Apr 2012
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    To be fair: When I was discharged after breaking my leg badly and having a pin installed, I had two home visits from a doctor at my practice, and further visits from the nurse to change dressings etc. I certainly had no complaints.

    My wife suffers from poor health, and is a regular visitor to the surgery. Her GP is an excellent doctor and consequently very popular. This means that to see him she has to book a week or even two in advance. There are five or six others, and I have always been quite happy to see any one of them. My wife has now found a female doctor she likes, so generally asks for her and gets an appointment within a day or two. The nurses at the surgery are also excellent.

    Doctors are human, and it is no surprise that the quality of care is variable. A surgery will take its example from the top, like any other organisation so if the senior partners are good, the rest are likely to be too. I know of other practices in town which seem to be run for the benefit of their staff rather than patients, but when I worked in the NHS, I was well aware of which were well run and which were not.

  10. #10
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    May 2008
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    I have been fortunate and in good health most of my life so doctors are like aliens to me as I never see them. However, some years ago I had an accident at work where I fell and the result was a sore back. thinking it was just a strain I went to work the next day and it got worse. I only just managed to drive home and was in agony that night only able to kneel with my body on the settee. The following morning my wife called the doctor for a home visit and a very stroppy lady doctor came to the house and gave me a right bollicking for not going to the surgery. No examination, no treatment, no advice, just get some Anadin.
    Next morning things were getting worse. Called the surgery again and same stroppy doctor attended and gave me a right earful for the same reason even though I couldn't move off the floor now. Wrote out a prescription for co-proxamol and told me to go and get it!
    Following morning was still in agony but had made it to bed. Surgery called again and a different doctor came. Did a quick examination and said, "When did you last go for a pee?" I said, "2 days ago. I can't get to the toilet."
    Within an hour I was in hospital where I remained for a month on traction, morphine and an epidural in the spine. Was discharged home with a sick note for 6 months and to visit the hospital before returning to work. On the visit sat in the waiting room and passed out with the pain I still had. Was readmitted for 3 days for more tests and to decide if an operation was necessary. They decided against it as the damage was too near the nerves. Sent home with another month's sick note. The consultant said I would never fully recover due to the damage from the fall and as I got older so things would get worse. And how true that has been.
    2 years ago and never having seen a doctor since, I went to my local surgery as the pain was returning. I met a new lady doctor who asked some questions and did a quick examination and prescribed, yes you've guessed, co-proxamol, which had no effect. Returning a few days later she said, "Well, what do you expect me to do?" No offer of a second opinion, a referral or physio.
    And my partner has been waiting for more than a year now for an operation. Excuse me if my views on the NHS are less than complimentary.

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