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Thread: Pressure washers

  1. #11
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    I suppose that it all depends on how you see your car. For me, it is a convenient means of getting Mrs Santa,me and whatever items we need at the time, from place to place. What I want is comfort and reliability. The existence of minor scratches on the lacquer is of little or no interest so long as the damage does not affect the underlying metal. I only wash it from time to time when it begins to look really bad.

  2. #12
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    I never use commercial car washing points of any kind. Water must be filtered and recirculated at these points (?), and how can one be sure that fine grit doesn't find its way back into the system?

  3. #13
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    Loony, regarding the use of grit-guards in the buckets, at first this sounded like a good idea, but wouldn't the normal sloshing of sponges/leathers in the water stir any fine grit back up through the guards?
    Accepting the need to avoid unsound practices (e.g., using washing up liquid), is car paintwork really that delicate? On very wet roads carrying surface water, I have had heavy oncoming vehicles send waves of the stuff (which must carry a fair amount of grit in it) thrown up at my car. Yet, after 5+ years, there is no detectable difference between the nearside and offside paint finish.

    Years ago I worked for the boss of a vehicle business (he was the area distributor for Atkinson lorries), and he had a brand new Merc. One serviceman in the business was charged with keeping the car clean, and was only permitted to use a chamois leather and clean water, and the car was always in showroom condition.

  4. #14
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    The grit guards stop larger particles from being dragged up by the sponge or cloth.
    The paintwork as such is not that delicate but it really depends on how you view your car. For Santa it is a tool to get from A to B. For others like Loony and me, it is more of a passion and pride. I dont go fishing, play football, spend hours in the pub so my car is not just a vehicle, it is my hobby too. So to that end I will wash and wax and polish it regularly and after spending a day cleaning it top to bottom, there is - for me at any rate - a sense of job satisfaction when it is done.

    Most people don't notice swirl marks (very light scratching of the lacquer) and to see them easily it is best to view the car in either sunlight or with a special light. Next time the sun is shining on the clean bonnet, stand back a little and look across the surface. You will often see minor circular scratches that look like Torvill and Dean have been practising on it. They are more noticeable on dark blues, dark reds and blacks. These can be removed using a polisher as the actual paint below the lacquer is not damaged.

  5. #15
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    When I had my first car, it was a professionally resprayed 1938 Standard 9 (I had a cousin in that trade) and, being an apprentice engineer, my hobby became DIY car maintenance. In those days I would spend hours cleaning and polishing my car. Eventually however, with marriage and raising a family, the car, although still looked after, became a workhorse. My current car (now just over 5 years old) and my previous one were bought new. I still keep my car clean and respectable, and dealership maintained, but the time between cleaning has got a bit longer, with several a quick washdowns between any longer spells of cleaning, when I sometimes polish with Mer. Providing that the car looks well cared for I am satisfied and I am also aware, now it is over 5 years old, over-fastidious waxing and polishing will not make one bit of difference to its selling value.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowball View Post
    I never use commercial car washing points of any kind. Water must be filtered and recirculated at these points (?), and how can one be sure that fine grit doesn't find its way back into the system?
    That reminded me of something that happened a few years ago. A guy took his car into a car wash one cold and frosty morning. He had bought his ticket the day before but not wanted to queue, so in he went, not realising that the strips on the brushes were icy. As you can imagine, the icy brush stripped the paint off the car pretty efficiently. I know he was trying to claim off the owners but never heard the outcome. Settled out of court I guess.

  7. #17
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    Thank you for these helpful replies. Off to the shops !

  8. #18
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    I've always get our cars clean over the years, inside as well as out. As mentioned earlier, I polish it with Mer as it's a great wax and really easy to use.I use a long handled nylon car brush, as with my mobility condition, that's the only way I can do it, but I use my home made trolley to polish the lower half.

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