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Thread: Road Surfaces

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
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    Default Road Surfaces

    Smudger posted this:

    Have you ever noticed that we don't see stone chips on the front of cars any more? I think it's because they don't surface the roads with them stone chips any more, they are using tar on them now.It used to be a way of checking a cars mileage years ago, along with the wear on the pedal pads, and on the car seats.They have resurfaced sections of the A92 recently, with a smooth tar surface, which is so smooth, it cuts down the rumbling noise level of the cars tyres on the road, it's great to drive on.I'm not sure what it will be like on the wet, when it comes to braking though?(I tried to start a new thread for this, but it would let me?)

  2. #2
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    Apr 2012
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    I found a 2004 report from the AA - http://www.roadsafetyfoundation.org/...tion_fdn34.pdf (Warning - PDF)

    Two related quotes:

    Surfaces
    Surfacing materials do not always deliver appropriate levels of both macro- and micro-texture throughout their service lives:
    • Accident rates increase markedly at low levels of macro-texture.
    • There is a need for a standard for macro-texture on in-service roads.

    The Skidding Standard.

    The Skidding Standard has provided a soundly-based structure for the effective allocation of resources to maintain the frictional
    properties of the Highway Network:

    • The Standard has been in operation on trunk roads and motorways since 1988.

    • A Code of Practice, similar to the Standard, has been established by local authorities for their highways.

    • There is a need to establish the contribution that the Skidding Standard has made to accident reduction since 1988 and to
    ensure it continues to meet the needs of the roads of the 21st century.

    -------------------
    Negative texture “new generation'' surfaces.

    New generation surfaces (often “low noise”) have lower early-life, dry-skidding-resistance than that which they were designed to
    deliver over the long-term:

    • Early on, these surfaces can be as slippery in the dry as in the wet.

    • Most local authorities do not have the means to measure or monitor dry skidding resistance.

    • Technologies should be developed, and local authorities equipped with the means, to quantify the risk that these surfaces may pose to the driver and develop strategies to alert them to it.

    • The industry should develop processes for improving the early life characteristics of new surfacings.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Santa View Post
    Smudger posted this:

    Have you ever noticed that we don't see stone chips on the front of cars any more? I think it's because they don't surface the roads with them stone chips any more, they are using tar on them now.It used to be a way of checking a cars mileage years ago, along with the wear on the pedal pads, and on the car seats.They have resurfaced sections of the A92 recently, with a smooth tar surface, which is so smooth, it cuts down the rumbling noise level of the cars tyres on the road, it's great to drive on.I'm not sure what it will be like on the wet, when it comes to braking though?(I tried to start a new thread for this, but it would let me?)
    I think you mean where they lay loose stones on the road surface and allow them to get ground into the tar.
    Round our way they still do this.

    Tarmac roads always contain stone in them though,its never just tar.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2008
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    Had my front bumper repainted 2 months ago due to stone chips. Now, its just as bad as it was so plenty loose stones on the roads.
    That scheme where they lay tar and just roll chips into it is till done around me, usually when its hot and the tar is breaking up.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
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    There is plenty of debris on the roads that can cause just as much damage (sometimes more) as stone chips. My car has a few small feint scratches due to what was either a mudflap or a piece of plastic fender being thrown up by an oncoming wagon. It was a bit foggy at the time, and the road was too busy to stop and find out what had hit the car.
    Windscreen and paintwork chips are a hazard which we have to accept as the norm, and suffering or escaping them is all down to luck.

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