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Thread: Advertised price lower than what was charged - Is this fair?

  1. #1
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    Default Advertised price lower than what was charged - Is this fair?

    6/03/2014 I ordered a kitchen item on line from JML. Their Autumn/Winter 2013 catalogue showed it to be 39.99, but I was charged 49.99 for it because "the catalogue was out of date". On receiving the item, enclosed was their Spring/Summer 2014 catalogue with the price still at 39.99. Their excuse was that this catalogue was also out of date.
    This Easter holiday, our daughter bought the same JML item on 19/04/2014 at a Robert Dyas store in Basingstoke - the ticket price was 39.99. And she got an extra 15% that was on offer for the weekend.
    21/04/2014, I went on the JML website and viewed their currently displayed catalogue - the price was still 39.99.
    A complaining email to them got a telephone reply that their charge to me was correct, and that they reserve the right to change prices and give offers when they wish.
    This is the first time I have received an offer that is DEARER than the usual price. Can't help wondering if this this is entirely legal.

  2. #2
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    It doesn't like like the normal way of things, they have to sell items at the price advertised! I would contact the trading standards folk, and they should sort it out for you.We had something similar happen to us, where they tried to charge us more, but I argued with them in the shop, they changed their mind, but I think it was because I was causing a scene in their shop, what ever it was....it worked, good luck.

  3. #3
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    Hi, smudger. Just checked JML's on line catalogue. Since my "words" with them about the anomaly, they have amended the price of the item in question to read 49.99. So no point in now chatting to Trading Standards as nothing can now be proven. Ah, well!

  4. #4
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    First off - no one HAS to sell goods for an advertised price. Honest mistakes are allowed for in law. That said, what happened to you would be a good reason to reject the goods and demand your money back - refusing to do that would be illegal.

    If they have an FB page - that might be a good place to embarrass them.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Santa View Post
    First off - no one HAS to sell goods for an advertised price. Honest mistakes are allowed for in law. That said, what happened to you would be a good reason to reject the goods and demand your money back - refusing to do that would be illegal.

    If they have an FB page - that might be a good place to embarrass them.
    You have really answered the situation, Santa - "Honest mistakes are allowed for in law." JML have now altered their on line catalogue price (which may come under the 'law' you mention), therefore any attempt on my part to embarrass them MIGHT come home to embarrass me, or worse.
    Fortunately, the item is still good value for money, and a similar (not same make) product is on sale at Lakeland at 10 dearer. My gripe was mainly based on principle and sloppy business practice.
    As I pointed out to JML, any future items they have of interest will only be bought if available at concession outlets, of which there are now several.

  6. #6
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    It remains the case that the old fashioned methods of buying are usually better than buying over the internet, in my humble opinion.

  7. #7
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    Horses for courses Dennis.

    Some things are just so much cheaper online - this especially applies when you are buying a known product from a reputable supplier. The TV I bought a couple of years ago - I ordered online, and collected it from the store. The computer I am using was completely online, and the tablet Mrs Santa takes to college also. I also buy things like shirts and socks online.

    OTOH I would not want to buy fruit and veg online, whoever the retailer is.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis W View Post
    It remains the case that the old fashioned methods of buying are usually better than buying over the internet, in my humble opinion.
    You are so wrong, Dennis, considerable savings can be made, as shown by Santa's experience. Taking all sensible precautions, buying on line is not risky.

    Just a few years ago, our Hygena built-in undercounter refrigerator failed. So I checked out the lower on line prices. It, and the matching freezer being in excess of 15 years old, when I enquired about the price at Curry's on line I also asked for a quote to supply a new Bosch refrigerator AND a matching Bosch freezer. After a bit of haggling, I managed to get the pair (which were a straightforward fit in place of the Hygena units) for a discount of around 90, and with free delivery. Quite a saving.

    On another occasion, I bought on line, again from Curry's, a satnav with provision to 'collect in store'. The satnav was taken out of the store's locked glass cabinet, as it would be for any in-store buyer, except that I paid 30 less than the counter price.
    Simples - tch!

  9. #9
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    We have bought a load of stuff from the Internet, as it's great for folk like us who can't get to the shops in town.We have never had any problems with buying on line, we even have on line banking, as well as our gas/ electric and Internet, T.V and phone, we save a lot of money by going paperless billing.

  10. #10
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    Same here, smudger, along with Direct Debits for recurring bills. Saves a lot of time and no risk of a lapse in an important bill being paid - e.g., car/home insurance. I may have printed this before, but I have a special, second current account for on line buying, and this normally has only about 30 in credit. Then, when I intend to make a purchase, I simply go on line to shift an appropriate amount into this account from my main account. This keeps my main account risk-free.

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