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Thread: You have got to laugh!

  1. #1
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    Default You have got to laugh!

    Silly season has well started here and we're seeing the impact on the roads already. Not just the perennial "mustn't drive faster than 25mph"; "I pulled into the passing place" (on wrong side) and the classic "passing places aren't for overtaking" - how they work that one out when the police notices tell you they are? - but we're also getting the livestock issues. Lambing's underway and one's always extra careful (altho' most of our free range sheep are pretty good at teaching the youngsters quickly) but to stop all traffic coz one ewe (sans lamb - she's still to drop) is lying down on the grass verge with six inches of her backside on the road? That happened four times in a 26 miles round trip yesterday. Then a local farmer was moving his Highlanders. Now apart from the fact that they were strung out over half a mile, these are well-trained sensible Highlanders who plod along with a car behind them and move into a passing place to let you past - kid you not! Panic stricken tourists in middle of road sounding off the horn and flashing lights - thought they had an emergency when I came up behind them - no, the Highlanders were coming towards them and there's been a lot in media about people getting killed by cows and bulls (Highlanders have horns so they thought they were all bulls, despite other obvious differences!). Had to count very slowly to ten once I realised the source of their terror and told them to stop sounding the horn and screaming and they'd nothing to worry about as they were ladies and had no calves (I wouldn't get between any Mum and her offspring!). By this time, the cows had reached us and you should have seen the jaws drop when I just scratched the one interested in my shoulder and then gave her a slight slap and told her to get on - they all ambled past with no hassles (although one of them left a liberal spraying on the nearside front screen/side!)! After a gentle lecture on the does and don'ts - plus a reminder of passing place rules, of dealing with livestock on the road, suggested they pull over and let the five or six cars that they'd blocked past whilst they recovered. Thankfully they did! They'd come to watch wildlife - well after the noise they made the very self-respecting otters in the bay 400 yards from the incident would definitely not be showing their faces! Had a good laugh with the friends I went to see, but in a way, it's very sad.

  2. #2
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    Benefits of country life, FJ. Once, on holiday in Cornwall, we were about to pass the gate of a farm when a cow that had bolted came charging out of the gate and almost in front of my bonnet, causing me to brake quickly to a stop. The cow, which had just given birth, then swerved and bolted along the nearside of my car. There was a lot of 'gunge' trailing from the rear end of the cow, and this got slapped across my windscreen - YUK! What a cleaning job!
    As you say FJ, "You have got to laugh".

  3. #3
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    It really isn't funny though. My meat comes from a supermarket not an animal!! I cannot understand people going on country holidays without any respect for the people and animals there inc the farmland.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trainman View Post
    It really isn't funny though. My meat comes from a supermarket not an animal!! I cannot understand people going on country holidays without any respect for the people and animals there inc the farmland.
    Strange reply that, Trainman. Your meat still comes from an animal, in spite of the fact it goes through a series of processes before it gets to the supermarket.
    I grew up in a city (terraced houses) but, since my early 20's, town or city I have lived on the edges and within spitting distance of the countryside. Being keen caravanners, and members of The Tational Trust, we enjoy spending our time in rural environments, and fully respect the countryside in all its aspects - which also includes taking all our rubbish back to base or depositing it in any appropriate bins provided. Very proud, too, that all our family descendants follow the same code of cleanliness.

    Ref. supermarkets - we find it repugnant and lazy that customers put items in their trolleys, then change their minds and dump the goods on any nearby shelf. Often, the item can be subject to freezer or chill cabinet storage. In these cases we hand the item to one of the store assistants - can't put it back on rightful shelf because we have no way of knowing how long it has be left out of the required cooling conditions. The biggest threat to our environment is people!!!

  5. #5
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    You have misunderstood me. There was an article not long back where many children and adults thought that meat just came from a supermarket and not from a reared and cared for animal.

  6. #6
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    That's sad, Trainman. Thankfully, our grand- and great-grand kids were brought up to receive information like this before reaching school age. Possibly the parents of these na´ve children were too busy watching football or going to Bingo to bother with the boring task of starting them off with a bit of early learning.
    Nah, leave it until they go to school and let teachers do the work!

  7. #7
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    Hey, put the post up because, if we didn't laugh, we'd probably lose the plot and this is only the start of the season!

    In this instance, it was the parents - in late 20s, I'd guess - who were panicking and saying stupid things. Once their kids saw me out of my car and "woman-handling" this large animal, the kids calmed down but parents didn't so it's the parents' parents that are also partly at fault.

    Snowman, Trainman isn't joking - there's a lot of people from two generations now who think our meat and fish come from some miracle pre-packed for them. Teaching kids about nature and subsequently our food sources isn't hard - most (though agree those in flats don't) have access to some green space and all you need is a hunting cat to teach about killing in nature - it's just up to the adults to explain and educate. Easier, I agree for those in more rural areas, but there's been a load of places kids can go to now as tourist attractions to learn about farming, etc. My first sex education was at the age of 7 on a programme of farm visits! (That was progressive, since now in my 60s!) Had an education in the Western Isles, from being hauled in by the local vet to help birth a calf to using up a sheep from death to pot - but have never, even, coped with the smell of skinning a rabbit. The only thing Im' afeard of is not making a clean kill - we used to shoot for food occasionally when had a huge mortgage and 15% interest rates and had house rates and other quarterly bills due plus car repairs. Many can't do that, then, let alone now, but, even if they could, life is so sanitised now.

  8. #8
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    When. I was in Asda recently, I saw a woman dumping some meat on a shelf in the bread section, that she must have put in her trolley earlier, but must have changed her mind. Another woman who had seen this, simply asked her why she never took it back to the cold shelf, where she first got it, and got a right mouthful of verbal abuse, and told to mind her own business?I remember thinking,.....I bet she wished that she had never opened her mouth, but it does show how ignorant and violent people are to each other's these days?

  9. #9
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    smudger, in Asda a week ago, I waited to one side with my trolley until an old dragon (perhaps not as old as me, though) had finished at the banana shelf. instead of just walking around my trolley and me, she pushed at the trolley, trying to force me backwards. I could not help but comment on her rudeness, which drew a heated mouthful. I made some comment to the effect that, if she was a widow, her late husband had gone to a better place.
    Terrible I know, but you have to treat rudeness with bluntness - polite words are a foreign language to these morons.

  10. #10
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    FJ, your comment about "those in flats and not having a green space being harder to teach about nature" is too sympathetic. Many of these parents probably concentrate on watching football, or reality rubbish like Big Brother. There are plenty of nature programmes on the box (Countryfile on BBC1 for example). And the local pub is oh so much more interesting than taking the kids to rural attractions! Also, now that kids can be taken into pubs, from an early age they are given a master class experience in becoming the next generation of lager-swilling potato couches.

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