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Thread: You have got to laugh!

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  1. #1
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    Default You have got to laugh!

    Silly season has well started here and we're seeing the impact on the roads already. Not just the perennial "mustn't drive faster than 25mph"; "I pulled into the passing place" (on wrong side) and the classic "passing places aren't for overtaking" - how they work that one out when the police notices tell you they are? - but we're also getting the livestock issues. Lambing's underway and one's always extra careful (altho' most of our free range sheep are pretty good at teaching the youngsters quickly) but to stop all traffic coz one ewe (sans lamb - she's still to drop) is lying down on the grass verge with six inches of her backside on the road? That happened four times in a 26 miles round trip yesterday. Then a local farmer was moving his Highlanders. Now apart from the fact that they were strung out over half a mile, these are well-trained sensible Highlanders who plod along with a car behind them and move into a passing place to let you past - kid you not! Panic stricken tourists in middle of road sounding off the horn and flashing lights - thought they had an emergency when I came up behind them - no, the Highlanders were coming towards them and there's been a lot in media about people getting killed by cows and bulls (Highlanders have horns so they thought they were all bulls, despite other obvious differences!). Had to count very slowly to ten once I realised the source of their terror and told them to stop sounding the horn and screaming and they'd nothing to worry about as they were ladies and had no calves (I wouldn't get between any Mum and her offspring!). By this time, the cows had reached us and you should have seen the jaws drop when I just scratched the one interested in my shoulder and then gave her a slight slap and told her to get on - they all ambled past with no hassles (although one of them left a liberal spraying on the nearside front screen/side!)! After a gentle lecture on the does and don'ts - plus a reminder of passing place rules, of dealing with livestock on the road, suggested they pull over and let the five or six cars that they'd blocked past whilst they recovered. Thankfully they did! They'd come to watch wildlife - well after the noise they made the very self-respecting otters in the bay 400 yards from the incident would definitely not be showing their faces! Had a good laugh with the friends I went to see, but in a way, it's very sad.

  2. #2
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    Benefits of country life, FJ. Once, on holiday in Cornwall, we were about to pass the gate of a farm when a cow that had bolted came charging out of the gate and almost in front of my bonnet, causing me to brake quickly to a stop. The cow, which had just given birth, then swerved and bolted along the nearside of my car. There was a lot of 'gunge' trailing from the rear end of the cow, and this got slapped across my windscreen - YUK! What a cleaning job!
    As you say FJ, "You have got to laugh".

  3. #3
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    It really isn't funny though. My meat comes from a supermarket not an animal!! I cannot understand people going on country holidays without any respect for the people and animals there inc the farmland.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trainman View Post
    It really isn't funny though. My meat comes from a supermarket not an animal!! I cannot understand people going on country holidays without any respect for the people and animals there inc the farmland.
    Strange reply that, Trainman. Your meat still comes from an animal, in spite of the fact it goes through a series of processes before it gets to the supermarket.
    I grew up in a city (terraced houses) but, since my early 20's, town or city I have lived on the edges and within spitting distance of the countryside. Being keen caravanners, and members of The Tational Trust, we enjoy spending our time in rural environments, and fully respect the countryside in all its aspects - which also includes taking all our rubbish back to base or depositing it in any appropriate bins provided. Very proud, too, that all our family descendants follow the same code of cleanliness.

    Ref. supermarkets - we find it repugnant and lazy that customers put items in their trolleys, then change their minds and dump the goods on any nearby shelf. Often, the item can be subject to freezer or chill cabinet storage. In these cases we hand the item to one of the store assistants - can't put it back on rightful shelf because we have no way of knowing how long it has be left out of the required cooling conditions. The biggest threat to our environment is people!!!

  5. #5
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    You have misunderstood me. There was an article not long back where many children and adults thought that meat just came from a supermarket and not from a reared and cared for animal.

  6. #6
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    That's sad, Trainman. Thankfully, our grand- and great-grand kids were brought up to receive information like this before reaching school age. Possibly the parents of these na´ve children were too busy watching football or going to Bingo to bother with the boring task of starting them off with a bit of early learning.
    Nah, leave it until they go to school and let teachers do the work!

  7. #7
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    No need to "look on the sly" - just take a look, ask for any explation you feel to be necessary, and make notes of any medication that you might wish to check on line later. In the event of any unhelpful stallng, take the matter up to the next level. Hopefully, all is above board but, considering worrying trends reported in the media of late, ensure that information is given to your entire satisfaction.
    Best wishes, Snowball.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowball View Post
    No need to "look on the sly" - just take a look, ask for any explation you feel to be necessary, and make notes of any medication that you might wish to check on line later. In the event of any unhelpful stallng, take the matter up to the next level. Hopefully, all is above board but, considering worrying trends reported in the media of late, ensure that information is given to your entire satisfaction.
    Best wishes, Snowball.
    I quite agree that there should be no need to have a sly look but some nurses get quite off hand if you pry into patients notes even though they are nearest and dearest. Personally I wouldn't. I would give the full info and explain any changes. I agree with you here Snowball but just suggested a way not to upset the applecart so to speak.
    Perhaps the better approach would be to ask the staff why she is so sleepy.

  9. #9
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    They don't have any charts on the bottom of the beds any more, in fact they were too keen to give me any information about her medication?In fact we were talking together today, and we have decided to ask if she can come now, as they are not doing much for her at all now?In fact the only reason she is there, is because she couldn't take her own weight, and although I can help her, I can't actually lift her.Besides she doesn't want to die in a hospice, she wants to to be in her own home.

  10. #10
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    Double post, due to first one disappearing?

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