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Thread: Personality vs electric vehicle adoption

  1. #11
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    to say a person's personality is possibly linked to their attitude towards electric vehicles is a fallacy from the word 'go'. It might be so in the case of a few but, in general, the attitude will more likely be linked to how such a vehicle would fit into their daily life. For example, I am a caravanner, and an electric vehicle, in today's technology, would not do the job. To run a second, electric vehicle, for other times would most likely present an add-on cost which, overall, would be more expensive than the one vehicle for everything. I am sure that there are very many drivers who have their own, practical and economically-based reasons for shunning an electric vehicle.

  2. #12
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    Surely the whole point of the research is to establish - methodically, using hard evidence, and with no preconceptions - whether there is or is not indeed a link.

    If scientists over the years had just listened to the chorus of "It's a fallacy" or "It's obvious", we'd still believe the earth was flat, that the sun revolved around it, and that it had been created in six days.

    Now, whether this particular research is worth spending time and money on is a different question entirely ....

  3. #13
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    Electrical manufacturers were trying to build electric powered cars 45 to 50 years ago. I know because I saw a Hillman Imp being converted to electric power in Rugby when I was an apprentice in the 1960s

  4. #14
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    Electric milk floats were common back in the 50s

  5. #15
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    Hospitals use electric vehicles to transport supplies and meals around the site.

    The advantage of electric milk floats is that they are very quiet for night time operation.
    Last edited by Dennis W; 20-04-14 at 17:37.

  6. #16
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    And their quietness is an issue, Dennis, as I personally can vouch for, having been hit by an electric car on a campsite - thankfully on the way BACK from the loo. The car may have been quiet and disturbed no-one's sleep but I can assure you my screams of pain did!

    However, back to the point of this survey, some of us think there are flaws and some of us think that pragmatism will have more influence on vehicle choice than personality.

    I stand for both of those views and I feel it would be courteous if the OP researcher came back on this forum to respond to our comments - let's face it, we've made constructive criticism on other researchers who have had the courtesy to respond. We have helped this individual by responding - courtesy should be mutual.

  7. #17
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    Dennis W said: "Electrical manufacturers were trying to build electric powered cars 45 to 50 years ago. I know because I saw a Hillman Imp being converted to electric power in Rugby when I was an apprentice in the 1960s."

    Electric cars were first produced in the 1880s. Every year, you can see pre-1904 examples taking part in the London to Brighton Veteran Car Run.

  8. #18
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    I got an article sent to me a last year, all about electric cars and how their development has been quashed by the powers that be, going right back to post war?It was really interesting, I was quite surprised.

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