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Thread: Mistake.

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowball View Post
    Do you drive/or are likely to drive on behalf of the NHS as part of your employment? Only in such cases would you have to inform them of any motoring convictions.
    In certain professions in the NHS other than driving, the regulatory body and hospital have to be notified of a criminal offence. This does not mean that anything will happen as it just goes on a record. The requirement is aimed at crimes other than those classified as motoring basics offences which carry points such as speeding. If you are a registered nurse, speak to you RCN /UNITE senior rep for guidance. Always remember that your union will help with advice on all legal matters if required. The RCN covers you legally to and from work for all travel/legal problems.I am aware of a nurse who forged time sheets and was sent to jail. She was NOT struck off the nursing register as expected and continues to practice. I was an RCN rep.

  2. #12
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    I don't think that it will affect your job, even if you have to drive a NHS vehicle. I got my "one and only" speeding ticket, while driving my ambulance, (due to work load which meant working an hour extra without pay?)It was about a month later, before management were informed by the police, but because I was never at our station much, they sent the letter to my home address, all it said was, that they knew that. I got a speeding ticket.

  3. #13
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    For certain offences, a NIP has to be given either (orally) at the time of the offence, or in writing to the vehicle's keeper within 14 days. (Road Traffic Offenders Act 1988).

    Unfortunately, driving without insurance does not appear to be one of these offences, and so what the officer said at the time is irrelevant.

    The six month limit for prosecution still applies.

  4. #14
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    The more I read this the more confused I get. As far as I can see the police had two choices - either issue a fixed penalty (of 300 and 6 penalty points) or arrest and report. They can also impound the car, but since the OP's girlfriend was insured to drive it, they had no need to do that.

    It is not beyond the bounds of possibility that the policemen was incorrect in what he said, or that the OP, who was understandably very anxious, got confused. I guess we will only find out when (if) the OP tells us.

    Note that the 6 month limit is not quite right - the case has to be laid before a court within 6 months - it may take a while after that before the OP hears anything.

  5. #15
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    Don't worry. I somehow feel this will all be finished with now, in your favour.

  6. #16
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    Santa wrote "As far as I can see the police had two choices - either issue a fixed penalty (of 300 and 6 penalty points) or arrest and report. They can also impound the car, but since the OP's girlfriend was insured to drive it, they had no need to do that."

    I believe the police actually had three choices. Arrest was not one of them, unless there were other circumstances. The choices were:

    1. Take no action (possible but unlikely)

    2. Issue a fixed penalty notice (didn't happen)

    3. Report for possible prosecution. That appears to be what the officer said he'd do, and there seem no reason to doubt him.

  7. #17
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    I will clear up some confusion for everyone.

    Firstly, the offence has been committed,that is the one of no insurance.

    Secondly, a verbal nip will have been given at the scene.

    Thirdly,the officer will report the offence to the ticket/processing office who will deal.

    I would expect a letter in the post soon op.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowball View Post
    I don't think the police can give a caution AND a referral for prosecution - it has to be one or the other. In terms of police/courts time, your offence is not one that presses for urgent attention, so there will almost certainly be a delay in processing. However, I don't think you are out of the woods yet - 4 months is not a long time, and I don't know what the finite time is for prosecution to be instigated; or if there is a finite time. You say the officer said he SHOULD be giving an FPN, so presumably he did not. I don't know if his superiors can issue an FPN in hindsight, which might mean a court summons if the Prosecution Service decided to go ahead. The only answer seems to be one of 'wait and hope'.
    Caution would be the nip.

  9. #19
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    Loony

    There is no need for a NIP for that offence, verbal or otherwise.

    Why should the OP expect a letter soon? He may, but he may also hear nothing until a summons arrives.

  10. #20
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    So glad to have Loony's insight. Clearly he was observing what actually happened in the back of that police car, while I was not.

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