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Thread: Minor accident - preempting difficulties - advice appreciated

  1. #31
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    Jul 2011
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    Hi Siani

    Your decision, but I'd definitely be pursuing the old trout for every last penny.

    BTW, she doesn't just need to "learn she has a rear view mirror". If she reads the Highway Code, it tells her she should also "look mainly through the rear window".

  2. #32
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    Mar 2014
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    Managed to get hold of her and now have a cheque! Here's hoping it clears! Yipee!

  3. #33
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    Glad you got it sorted out in the end, these kind of things can wear you down, good luck.

  4. #34
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    Mar 2013
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    Pleased you have had a satisfactory outcome ; although you could have done without the hassle in the first place. However the lady has been, in my view it is disappointing that some people have used such disrespectful language about her.

  5. #35
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    Aug 2011
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    If she is over the age of 70, perhaps she is no longer fit enough to drive. I would report the accident to the Police making the suggestion that they may wish to assess her fitness to drive. It is even possible that her licence has already been revoked, that MAY be the reason she does not wish to go thru the insurance company.

  6. #36
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    Mar 2013
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    I find it impossible to reply to such a vindictive post.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by belucky22 View Post
    I find it impossible to reply to such a vindictive post.
    This post may not be as vindictive as first presumed. I have just been through my eyesight test at the opticians. Being nearly 79, I mentioned fitness to drive. I was pleased to be told by the optician my current 2-year-old prescription had barely changed. She went on to say that it was her responsibility to advise where there was an indication that a patient's eyesight fell below the acceptable standard for driving, and that I would be surprised by how many patients ignored such advice.
    Since the woman in question ran into a parked vehicle, Dennis's comments may not be out of place. Before expressing what might be misguided feeling of sympathy for her, consider the possibility that she could be unfit to drive, and may one day kill someone.

  8. #38
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    Mar 2013
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    It MAY be that she is not fit to drive. However, some people are also not fit to be on the road. Let's have consistency of treatment. My concern is that this is tagged on to a thread concerning a particular accident where the lady has not behaved correctly. My personal belief is that there should be both random checks on fitness to drive. This would including catching people driving when they are too tired to be driving safely as well as general fitness/eyesight etc. If we all started to report people WE thought shouldn't be driving then I suspect the system may become overloaded. Age is not the sole indicator of fitness to drive. If a driver is unsafe they should not be allowed on the road. Despite being physically fit my father gave up motoring when he reached 80 believing he no longer had the reactions he felt were needed.

  9. #39
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    Apr 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by belucky22 View Post
    It MAY be that she is not fit to drive. However, some people are also not fit to be on the road. Let's have consistency of treatment. My concern is that this is tagged on to a thread concerning a particular accident where the lady has not behaved correctly. My personal belief is that there should be both random checks on fitness to drive. This would including catching people driving when they are too tired to be driving safely as well as general fitness/eyesight etc. If we all started to report people WE thought shouldn't be driving then I suspect the system may become overloaded. Age is not the sole indicator of fitness to drive. If a driver is unsafe they should not be allowed on the road. Despite being physically fit my father gave up motoring when he reached 80 believing he no longer had the reactions he felt were needed.
    I generally agree with you. However, this topic has lost perspective because of concerns that an elderly woman ran into a parked car, was then obstructive and somewhat insulting to the third party. The problem was exacerbated because some posters seemed to feel that her "apparent, perhaps presupposed, frailty" should somehow deserve lenience contrary to what is the blunt, legal position.

    It is incidents like this that often betray a driver who is not fit to drive, and bringing them into the open is frequently the only way they are caught before causing real grief to others and themselves. And this fact, belucky22, is supported by your own penultimate sentence.

  10. #40
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    Quote...."If we all started to report people WE thought shouldn't be driving then I suspect the system may become overloaded."Geez! Who are we going to report them to? The police have enough problems as it is with enforcing the laws that are already in place?Also, if we are so concerned about the standards of drivers on our roads, why do they keep allowing persistent offenders, back on the road? For example, a driver who has been caught driving while drunk, FOUR times previously!Along with drivers who have been banned from driving, for repeated speeding offences, yet they are allowed back on the roads, when they get their license given back to them?

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