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Thread: Cavity wall insulation.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
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    Default Cavity wall insulation.

    Had cold callers several times - saying this was a free installation. Next door neighbour had it done - haven't discussed it with them but unlikely they would pay for it!!! Saw a Martin Lewis email, saying British Gas were doing it free, with no conditions (benefits, etc) to qualify. So arranged for a survey which was suppose to be carried out yesterday.
    Woman from BG turned up and said she would have to drill several holes in the walls to check that no insulation already existed in the cavities, and that the construction was suitable. My explanation that it is a semi and that the adjoining house had already been done recently, and that I knew for certain that my house did not have wall insulation was brushed aside. She said that some houses were insulated during build, whilst others were not. I pointed out that they would not insulate only one half of a pair of semis - but still no joy.
    She then said that, as we had a flat roof sun lounge, with walls that were not brick, scaffold could not be erected over the sun lounge. Neighbour has a similar sun lounge, but they worked on his roof. I indicated that my sun lounge roof was load bearing - workmen used it to reach the fitting of new facias, soffits and drain gutters. Still no joy - she said that drilling in the upper rear walls would have to be from the inside, and the radiators in those rooms would have to be removed.
    At that point I stopped her right there - no way was this going to happen. I then said that, based on estimates for similar houses, my energy supplier (E.on) showed my energy consumption to be GOOD. I showed her the written facts, but she did not appear to understand how this assessment was derived.
    So, because of bad experiences with British Gas at our previous house (we left there in 1985) I have always had a principle not to deal with BG, or to allow them onto my premises. Yesterday's experience has confirmed to me that my principles are right, and still as valid today.
    If any cold callers arrive in the future, trying to push cavity wall insulation, they'll get short shrift from me if they cannot walk away from a simple "no thank you".

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    Scotland
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    Snowball, we got our house done for free, but they never drilled any holes from the Inside? Tell the truth we never noticed much difference after it was done, despite what they told us before they started.We did however notice a huge difference after we had a new boiler and radiators installed, as that cut our gas bill down by 50%, as our old system meant that we couldn't get any hot water unless the heating was on???One thing we did notice after the cavity wall insulation was done, was that it cut down a lot of the noise from outside.

  3. #3
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    Apr 2007
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    Hi, smudger - ".....old system meant we couldn't get any hot water unless the heating was on". Did that mean a boiler fault and that you had to have the C.H. running? Would the boiler not operate when switched to 'Hot water only'?
    Some 12+ years ago, I installed a complete new system myself, and fitted it with a Combi boiler. Because the hot water supply is instant from the boiler on demand, therefore no storing of hot water, I found a similar drop in gas consumption. Typically, some of the saving was due to not storing hot water, and some of it due partly to the fall in efficiency of the aging boiler, and partly due to improvements in boiler design. Is your new boiler also a Combi?

  4. #4
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    Apr 2012
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    replacing an old boiler is an expensive, but worthwhile, exercise. I had mine done in 2010 and it has probably paid for itself by now.

  5. #5
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    Apr 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Santa View Post
    replacing an old boiler is an expensive, but worthwhile, exercise. I had mine done in 2010 and it has probably paid for itself by now.
    Santa, My fitting of a new C.H. system came about by accident. We had ordered a new kitchen, which I intended (and did) to install myself. Finding the sink we wanted at Plumb centre, I went in to buy it. Whilst waiting to be served I glanced idly at the trade fliers under the glass top of the counter. There was an offer of a Worcester Combi-boiler, 7 radiators, thermo control valves, copper piping, etc. The price looked very reasonable (probably trade) so I ordered this kit. I went through the house and installed the system before completing the kitchen, and just had a plumber in to connect the gas to be legal. The system is now about 12+ years old and I think it cost me around 1,200 to 1,300 to install. The post-fitting gas consumption dropped so much that I almost (but only 'almost') felt guilty for taking our Winter Heating Allowance.

  6. #6
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    Aye! Snowball, yea! our old heating system confused a few plumbers that we had asked to do the job? In the end we found one that would take it on. Even he said that he had never seen one like it?But he went ahead and ripped the whole boiler out, and fitted new radiators as well. What a difference it made to our gas bill, it must have paid for itself within the first six months!Even with the vast increase in gas prices, we are still cheaper than we were before the new boiler.

  7. #7
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    Apr 2007
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    Because I fitted each radiator with thermostatic valves (except the one in the hall and the one in the bathroom - this so that all radiators could not be accidentally turned off and cause pump damage), I did not fit a room thermostat. Modern installations are now required to have a room thermostat fitted (thermostat valves or not), which I find a bit stupid. a room thermostat will not give precise control throughout a property and, in the rooms where the stat isn't placed, this can result in radiators being either running too hot or shutting down before a satisfactory level of heat has been achieved in a particular room.
    Another thing that bemuses me is, where government sponsored ads about fuel costs have recommended turning the stat down one degree (repeated yearly), if this is done on an accumulative basis, it doesn't take long before, even if the C.H. is running, the temperature in the home leaves the occupants in danger of hypothermia.

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