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Thread: Health and driving

  1. #1
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    Aug 2006
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    Default Health and driving

    Did you know that a bad back could slow your breaking? A heavy cold can halve your concentration? Or that you can travel up to 50ft with your eyes closed during a sneeze?

    Whilst it's important to obey the Highway Code and respect speed limits, our health and well-being can also compromise our safety behind the wheel.

    How do you think health might affect the way we drive?

  2. #2
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    Apr 2007
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    I always lift my foot from the accelerator if I am going to sneeze. And, whether you believe it or not, over the years I have trained and disciplined myself NOT to allow a sneeze to close my eyes. I think allowing a sneeze to expel with a released verbal 'atishoo' helps. Not normally good manners, but a secondary consideration when behind the wheel.
    Does a bad back make much difference with modern servo-assisted brakes?
    Where health is concerned, along with the possible effects of any medication being taken, a sensible driver will stay away from the wheel if his/her driving if the ability to drive safely is in any way impaired.

  3. #3
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    Aye! I've always found it that it's a but safer to keep my eyes open when I'm driving!Seriously though, I can never sneeze just once, it's always around six in a row.

  4. #4
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    Whilst many medications warn you not to drive or not to drive if it makes you feel drowsy, medications can also have very odd other side effects. I was given some anti-biotics earlier this year to counter-act an infection from a rose thorn scratch; it wasn't one I'd had before and it sent me hyper big time within four hours of first dose.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by smudger View Post
    Aye! I've always found it that it's a but safer to keep my eyes open when I'm driving!Seriously though, I can never sneeze just once, it's always around six in a row.
    Firing off six in a row, smudger? - you must have a bad colt!!!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowball View Post
    Firing off six in a row, smudger? - you must have a bad colt!!!
    Those young horses can be vicious...

  7. #7
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    When I was a teenager I had a Lambretta and I was on my way to work down a country lane, when I sneezed. When I came round I was laying in a ditch - fortunately I was able to retrieve the scooter from the hedge and carry on.

    Seriously, I think mental attitude is a big problem. The guy who has had a row with his wife before setting off; the woman who has a screaming match with her teenage daughter then takes the younger ones to school; a worker driving home after being made redundant; I could go on. Driving does require most of our attention. There is a little to spare for looking at scenery or listening to music, or even having a conversation; but if we are fuming after a row, or distracted by some other event, we are bound to be driving badly.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Santa View Post
    Those young horses can be vicious...
    I was thinking of a revolver - not horses, Santa but, considering it, they do have their own version of 'kick'!

    Quote Originally Posted by Santa View Post
    When I was a teenager I had a Lambretta and I was on my way to work down a country lane, when I sneezed. When I came round I was laying in a ditch - fortunately I was able to retrieve the scooter from the hedge and carry on.
    Ha, I had one of those. Headlamp fixed to main frame, so pointing in wrong direction on sharp bends. Did you ever turn the handlebars too sharply at slow speed, and the front wheel reverse back from under you? Only did it once, though!

    Seriously, I think mental attitude is a big problem. The guy who has had a row with his wife before setting off; the woman who has a screaming match with her teenage daughter then takes the younger ones to school; a worker driving home after being made redundant; I could go on. Driving does require most of our attention. There is a little to spare for looking at scenery or listening to music, or even having a conversation; but if we are fuming after a row, or distracted by some other event, we are bound to be driving badly.
    Know what you mean, Santa, but if we are decent drivers shouldn't we calm down, even taking a walk for a while, before setting out to drive?

  9. #9
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    Mar 2014
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    I have seen a few people in Courts have the fact that they were taking CoProxymol, and how it can affect people, taken into account when being sentenced. Yet when I was prescribed them some years ago, I was given no warning by my GP as to how they could affect me. Similarly, I know people who have been prescribed various sleeping pills, who drive to my house telling me how lousy they feel/felt and are no longer taking them. Not that long ago I was told that reaction times are now down to around 0.75 of a second due to the general state of health of people, and that reaction times are more reliant on good health than mentral astuteness.

  10. #10
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    Rolebama, I have reported to the company and NHS the reaction I had. There was no warning from the GP, nor in the contra-indications in the packet and I did not have any of the do not take this if you have this conditions list. It's scary. I have now added this anti-biotic to my do not give emergency bracelet list!

    Altho' digressing somewhat from the OP, how many people who have allergies etc., actually carry some sort of medical alert bracelet, etc.,? I have to, should I have an accident and be unconscious with open wounds, I could be given anti-Tetanus - I nearly died as a result of getting the standard anti-Tet vaccination at school!!

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