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Thread: Purchasing of Cat D cars

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
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    2

    Default Purchasing of Cat D cars

    Does the Garage have to tell me if the car is a Cat D? Bought one and didn't know, what can I do about it?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
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    1

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    Yes they do! Cars sold at a garage should have a HPI check done which will show if the vehicle has any markers against it. They are obliged by law to declare this when selling to the public

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
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    53

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    They should,,, but they don't have to... as CAT D class as legally repair and put it back on Road and we know cars get repairs on the regular bases and every repair does not documented Also if car number plate was visible on the time of advertising or sale then it's normally buyer's responsibility to check before buy. CAT D are legal to buy and Sell there is no need for panic If you bought one and it's run perfect don't worry

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
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    2,738

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    I think that the point is that the value is reduced by being cat 'D'. If the buyer didn't know, he may have paid too much. Of course he may well have bought it thinking it was a great bargain, and now finds that it is not so much.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    8,250

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    A car dealer or trader is legally obliged to inform a customer if a car is recorded A, B, C, or D. If you don't believe me then visit Autotrader's site where it is explained.
    Try putting an ad in there for a Cat D without mentioning it and see what happens.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    8,577

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    Aye! They will come down on you like a ton of bricks!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    53

    Default What is CAT A, B,C and D

    CAT A, B are totally right Off cars and can not be put it back on road they are mainly use for dismantling or spare parts

    CAT C is substantially Damage car, after the accident you have to submit your log book back to DVLA then after the VIC Test by VOSA you have to apply for a new logbook, VIC test normally cost but you don't have to pay for the new log book, Insurance companies avoid repairing CAT C because of the high cost and announce them right off but if the owner decide to pay for the repairs they can repair it and put it back on the road, VOSA will add permanent marker on your log book, because CAT C & D is a legal Category therefore Insurance company do not ask you either your car is CAT or not, they will insure your car as normal.

    CAT D is not a substantially Damage car therefore no Marker added on to your Log book but it will show up when HPI check is carried out, it can be legally repair either by owner or Insurance companies and put it back on road as normal car, there is no need to submit your logbook to DVLA or Not even VIC test require by VOSA as it's a legal category therefore Insurance companies will insure your car as normal.

    There is also another category called X which doesn't even show in HPI Check, with the rough estimate 75% of used cars sale on either web or on road have a accident history, If you are selling car with invisible number plates then by Trading standard Seller have to tell the buyer that their car had a history and Category marker it's been put under after the accident but if car is been advertised with visible number plate then it's buyer's responsibility to check before buy, for this reason most of the car selling website provides a link to the HPI check websites. There is no value issues involve when dealing with cars with CAT markers, because cars been repaired before advertised, Car's devalue on daily bases CAT's are Just for Insurance companies whether they want to repair them or not,
    Last edited by car-auctions; 12-04-14 at 03:20.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    2,738

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    It does seem to cause a great deal of confusion. While I don't doubt car-auctions explanation at all - I am not sure that even the insurance companies always get it right. We have seen on here where the buyer of a Cat C has been required to provide documentation.

    To me, the main problem would stem from this confusion. Many buyers will steer clear of a car with a marker, simply because they are not sure what it will mean. This must have the effect of reducing its value.

    We know full well that the absence of a marker is no guarantee that it has not been in a quite serious shunt, whereas a minor scrape and replacement bumper can write another car off to cat D. Even brand new, ex showroom cars might have needed some bodywork repairs.

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