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Thread: Driveway - parking over a dropped kerb.

  1. #41
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    699

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    Recently I had some work done a a small skip was dropped on my driveway for the rubbish from the job. Being neighbourly I asked a neighbour could I put my car on her driveway to avoid inconveniencing anyone. No problem, so my car was two doors away. On the day of the skip collection from my driveway I had someone park a van on my front and two cars right opposite my driveway. The lorry driver struggled to get onto the skip and was going to leave it. Two neighbours opposite (so called friends) sat and watched him struggle. One came out and shifted her car but by now he was at an odd angle and it was of no help. The other creep carried on as if it wasn't there. I have no idea who the damn van belonged to. So in future I will not be so considerate as to block my drive with a skip and go out of my way to leave the road clear. The skip will go on the front with suitable lighting and my car will be on my drive.

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    8,456

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    We often have the odd car parked across our drive, even when there is no car in front of our or the neighbours house and, the daft thing is, there is enough room for two cars between the dropped kerbs. When drivers cannot make a job of parking correctly, no wonder there are road accidents.
    In over 60 years of driving, I have never parked across a dropped kerb (except my own driveway).

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Middlesex
    Posts
    8,509

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    I seem to remember posting on here before about a friend's dropped kerb. They have turned to fence panels (6' x 6') into gates. So from the road it doesn't stand out that it is an entrance/exit. They also have a dropped kerb. They have called the Parking Wardens out a few times now because of people parking across the dropped kerb. As I said before, this Borough enforce all dropped kerbs as they are also used by wheelchairs for crossing the road.

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    8,456

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    Drawing up at a dropped kerb, this should prompt an observant driver to look for the possibility that there is an entrance. After all, many commercial establishments (sometimes small and in an otherwise residential area) often have tall, plain gates.
    Just over the road from us, the corner house has a garage in the side road. The owner has put up a sliding gate that matches the tall fencing, and he doesn't seem to have a problem with parking.

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