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Thread: Driveway - parking over a dropped kerb.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
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    1

    Default Driveway - parking over a dropped kerb.

    Hi,

    New poster, hello everyone.

    We have a problem with parking. Next-door is a childminder. Parents think nothing of parking across our drive when dropping/picking their children up. My girlfriend asked the childminder if she ask her clients to please not park over our drive (it is dropped down kerbstones). Some kept doing it, so she'd ask them or I would if I saw it.

    Anyway tonight, I had just got in and a car pulled up across our drive blocking in both our cars. The woman sat in the car for ages, seemingly taking her time. When she got out I asked her would she please move her car as it was blocking our drive.

    "I'm just picking my children up".

    "But you are blocking our drive."

    "I'll only be a couple of minutes."

    "What if we are going out? Why don't you park outside next-door (the childminder's drive was not in use and there was a big gap behind their other car)?"

    "What is the problem?"

    "You are parked over our drive, it is against the law to obstruct a drop-down pavement."

    "No it isn't."

    Then my neighbour the other side comes out (he's best mates with next-door) and says "your mate has been parking on our drive, not blocking the drive but on it".

    "Which mate?"

    "The one in the Black BMW."

    "I don't have a mate with a black BMW" (I don't). I thought he must have meant either my girlfriends dad (Black Renault) or my brother (Black Golf) - neither of whom park on their drive.

    It turns out it was the father of one of the childrens friends. We had a sleepover for his 13th birthday, this chap didn't know where exactly we lived, got confused and parked on their drive by mistake (this happened about 3/4 months ago).

    In the meantime the woman hadn't moved the car so I asked her again, she refused so I got my phone out and went to take a photograph of the number plate.

    He then intervened again accusing me of overreacting. The girlfriend comes out and points out that the police made me move my car because "your mate next-door (the childminders husband) told the police (even though he parks his cars on the pavement).

    I said to him "well our drive gets used as a car park for the childminders clients when we are both at work" (one of the elder children has reported cars being parked on our drive whilst they go next-door to pick up their children).

    This women tells me to "get out of her face" (I wasn't). The thing is next-doors intervention as really annoyed me, "what has it got to do with him?" I said to my girlfriend "well he is best friends with next-door" was her reply.

    I'm still seething now and it takes a lot to wind me up. Neither my girlfriend or I would park across someone's drive, supposed they want to go out, supposed they fall ill and need to get them to hospital urgently?

    Our 3-year-old has a breathing problem, which could flare up at anytime. The doctors have told us not to phone an ambulance if he has a problem, but to bring him straight in. Thankfully he hasn't had a problem since he was 6 months old, indeed he and spent a week in hospital. I explained that to next-door, the guy complaining about the parking on his drive.

    I apologised for parking on the drive, but I had no idea and to be honest if it was a mistake, someone had got confused I wouldn't be bothered as long as it was moved.

    We on the other hand get our drive blocked on a regular basis, all the while it is clear outside the childminders. This really annoys us.

    Feel like calling the police for some advice. We've tried the nice/pleasant way and it doesn't work. I know it is against the law, I found this out from the Council's Highway Department.

    Anyone have an experience of this.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    Scotland
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    8,522

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    Aye! It's a tricky situation which requires sorting out quickly, before it gets ugly. Believe me, it can get way out of control, as it happened to us when we lived up north.

    Try inviting your neighbour round to talk about it, keep it friendly and tell them you don't want this to cause friction and bad feeling between you, after all, you have to live together in the same street.

    You could get mediation, which is available from your local council, but that would be the last resort, good luck.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Middlesex
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    8,509

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    Does your local Borough/Council not have Parking Wardens (by any other name), certainly around here a phone call works wonders. They turn up in a flash, drop off the paperwork, take the photo and are gone within minutes. The Borough like the revenue.
    It has to be remembered that they are 'clients' of the neighbour, and if she sees her income dropping because people stop using her through not being able to park as and where they want, i have found no better leverage.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
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    1,052

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    It's illegal to block access to the highway but not to your drive.

    In other words you need to be able to get off your drive but not onto it.

    So if there is no car in the drive the no problem but if there is they should not block it.

    However I think you are over reacting and causing more problems.
    If you were going out right then,then ok fair enough.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
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    We live around the corner from a primary school, and our road is choked with cars for a short time twice every weekday (except school holidays). On occasions, a couple of CPO's have been on site during the arrival of cars (probably as a result of complaints - I don't know who by), and these officers have told drivers it is illegal to park across a dropped kerb and told them to move, whether there is a car on the drive or not.
    I did have one instance of a woman parking her car across my drive (my car was on the drive), and when I asked her to move it she replied that the roads were free for everyone. I said that I agreed, but that freedom also applied to me, and her car was robbing me of that freedom. "So remove the **** car now!" She did so, with a lot of grumbling.

    I have heard of the ruling similar to your description, Loony. Probably correct, but not sensible. People do arrive home with items loaded in their vehicles which necessitates backing a car onto the drive to unload heavy goods.

    Even with 60 years of driving behind me, I have never parked across a dropped kerb and, frankly, would be ashamed of my ignorance if it became necessary for a home owner to ask me to move my car. This form of parking is nothing more than an extension of our shoddy driving standards.

  6. #6
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    Apr 2012
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    I can see both sides of this. My computer is at the front of the house, and I have a view of the drive. When someone parks and blocks it, our neighbour has a lot of deliveries, I find myself irrationally annoyed, even though it is causing me no inconvenience whatsoever.

    The neighbour has little or no control over where her 'customers' park. Ask anyone who lives near a primary school. They will tell you that they plan their days to avoid leaving or arriving between 3 and 4pm.


    Quote Originally Posted by smudger View Post
    Try inviting your neighbour round to talk about it, keep it friendly and tell them you don't want this to cause friction and bad feeling between you, after all, you have to live together in the same street.
    I think this is the best solution. It surely is only a problem for a short time each day, and falling out with neighbours is never a good idea. Maybe a sign 'please don't block our drive' might help, but I doubt it.

    I think that you are going to have to live with it.

  7. #7
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    Apr 2007
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    Santa, I could not agree more with your sentiments. I don't worry about about the short stay of delivery drivers, neither do I mind a car being across my drive when the driver remains in it.
    We do have cars parked in the road - especially long stay ones from the day nursery, which opens around 7 a.m. and closes about 6 p.m.
    When using our Caravan, we plan a Saturday or Sunday for setting out, and Sunday for returning home. Being retired, this is easy for us.

    Loony, thinking about parking across a drive when there is no car on it, it could be in the garage, of course. Regarding refusal to move when the owner arrives and wishes to get onto the drive sounds to me like an act of deliberate obstruction, separate from the original blockage by parking.

  8. #8
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    Aug 2011
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    If this were me, I would find some discarded traffic cones, and place them in a line along the pavement, as thought there were road works in progress.

  9. #9
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    Oct 2009
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    Leave your car over your driveway at the times they pick up the kids. Ask the council if the neighbours are registered child minders and if the property is declared a business as such. Ask HMRC if Miss Childminder declares her revenue to them. Ask the DWP if she is claiming benefit. Ask the council to intervene and the police. If they want to be plonkers you can make it difficult for them too.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    Its situations like this that one wishes one could obtain a "stinger" such as the police use.

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