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Thread: How did the RAC (and others) coped with extreme weather conditions on 23rd December?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
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    Default How did the RAC (and others) coped with extreme weather conditions on 23rd December?

    I was due to travel back from the West Country on 23rd December but a mechanical failure to the vehicle prevented me from travelling. Originally, the service dealer thought it OK to proceed home (with caution) but this was the day that the worst storm in living memory hit the South Coast, and I wondered how stretched the RAC was on that day. If we had become stuck en route would we have had to wait hours for a recovery vehicle and the hire car offered under warranty? My thought is that, for all their professionalism and capabilities, the RAC (and others) would have been stretched above and beyond their abilities in such extreme weather conditions and the number of associated callouts. Can anyone provide some stats to assist my case for getting the work done in advance of travelling?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
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    Half an inch of snow and it all grinds to a stop.

    When the advice is to avoid all but essential travel - it's best to take it for all kinds of reasons. Doubly so in a faulty vehicle.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    Scotland
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    Aye! it makes you wonder how our generation ever got educated, we used to walk through snow drifts, just to get to school, no school run cars in those days?

    The trains use to run in those days as well, even with two leafs on the line.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
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    Middlesex
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    I don't remember half the problems with inclement weather that we have now. In fairness though, I know that quite a lot of people used to lay their cars up for the winter, relying on what public transport there was. When it snowed, our local coalman used to fit a makeshift plough to the front of his lorry which helped to keep the local roads open.
    I remember in my first Mini, when it snowed, I had to stop every so often to clear the bank of snow I was creating across the front of it. I could keep going until the snow came over the top of the bonnet.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
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    During my time with the AA, it was a club, so there could not be a profit at the end of the year. This meant that in busy periods we could all be out on overtime increasing the numbers of Patrols on the road. If the busy times were a bit on the quiet side there would be enough money left in the kitty to buy us a new piece of equipment or clothing. It was reckoned on average that there would only be ten days of the year which counted as 'busy'. Usually freezing fog or snow would see the most callouts, although the hurricane of '87 would take some beating with so many people calling us to move trees or other debris off the roads.

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