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Thread: Powerful new THINK! film shows effects of alcohol the morning after drinking

  1. #1
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    Default Powerful new THINK! film shows effects of alcohol the morning after drinking

    To your body, the morning after is still the night before" - this powerful new film from the government's THINK! campaign shows a man miming to his own drunken voice recorded the night before, highlighting the shocking statistic that 1/5 drink drive accidents happen in the morning.

    Please share this with your friends and stay safe this Christmas! http://youtu.be/Z_x0NH47nac

  2. #2
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    Back in the 70s when I was working at an oil construction site, we started work at 07.00.

    Every Sunday morning the police would be at the top of the road, carrying out breath tests, as a lot of the lads used to go out on the Saturday night for a drink.

    The amount of folk they caught was so worrying, that most of us wouldn't even go out on the Saturday, if they were working on the Sunday, as no license for us meant no job?

  3. #3
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    I have been stopped at 5 or 6am by the Police because my driving has been 'too good', because they have wondered if I am being over-cautious due to having had a drink the night before and still under the influence. I have no problem with this as I would rather be inconvenienced occasionally than on the wrong end (again) of another drunk driver.

    I really don't think our anti drink drive campaigns are 'harsh' enough though, having seem some the film/TV ads from Australia. They do not mess around.

  4. #4
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    Good to see they were taking it seriously back in the 70s too, Smudger. And Rolebama - 'too good', wow. Did not know the police did that. Well done for having such a reasoned view on it. Have a good Christmas both.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Laura W RAC View Post
    Good to see they were taking it seriously back in the 70s too, Smudger. And Rolebama - 'too good', wow. Did not know the police did that. Well done for having such a reasoned view on it. Have a good Christmas both.
    Laura, back in the 80's Cumbria police used to stop cars to tell the driver he/she was driving very well. It was part of their campaign on safe driving. I can reflect on a drink driving experience that I had. We had gone to a party in Mobberley and I had one glass of wine at about 8.30pm. From then on I only drank lemonade until we went home at 01.00. I had, at that time, an Austin 3 litre automatic. As we left Knutsford there was a road block with several policemen at intervals in a very tight long coned area. It was a check to see if anyone had passed the point the night before as a man had been murdered in the petrol station nearby. I was asked where I had been and where I was going. I told him that I had been to a party. He asked me if I had had a drink and I told him yes. He got very close (enough to kiss me arghhhhh!!) Then he said drive carefully. I had about 150 yards of cones to drive through that were about a foot wider apart than the car. He stood in the road and watched to see if I touched any. I didn't of course but had I tried taking the chance of having a couple that night I am sure that I would have been arrested. So now no drinking and driving and if I do intend having a drink it is taxis and no driving the next day. I have seen so many disasters in my job through drink than I care to remember. So glad I am retired now.

  6. #6
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    Frankly, in my opinion, the guy in the clip had had more than a few drinks the night before. When I have been partying (and either using a taxi or staying over), I have had what I would call a good 'skinful', but never been that bad the morning after. My practice, after drinking is, 12 hours minimum before driving if drinking was very moderate, to a full 24 hours-plus if the session was prolonged - although this would not amount to a stupor level.
    I had a colleague who was a bit of a lad for the bevvy, and he could not tell anyone next day how much he had drunk, unless someone who was with him had bothered to take count.

    As usual, this Christmas and New Year, it will be a combination of visits by collection and return by taxi, to staying over. And all drinking will be in private homes - no visiting pubs.

  7. #7
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    When I started driving long distance lorries in the 60s, we didn't have beds in the cabs, so we stayed in digs. I was never a great drinker, and I always needed my sleep; but it was a common sight to see drivers going out for the evening and returning in a pretty merry state at well after midnight. When I got up in the morning at 7am, they would be gone. It is no surprise that the drink-drive statistics were so bad then.

    If you are interested, here is a link to a montage of the Australian anti drink drive films set to Everybody Hurts. It starts off slow, but I found it a bit of a challenge to watch all the way through. Not for the faint hearted.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z2mf8DtWWd8

  8. #8
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    A very hard hitting video indeed. Thanks for sharing, Santa.

  9. #9
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    The drivers who should be reading this thread and watching the video cannot. Because they are already in the pub.....

  10. #10
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    I am sorry if I appear to go on about this, but I have had two cars lost to me because of incidents involving drunk drivers. On both occasions the occupants of all cars walked away. For this I have always been thankful because I have seen aftermaths of incidents where fate has not been so kind. However, at the time of the events when I am initially wondering how I am going to get the wreckage recovered, and myself and other occupants home, probably only after attending Police Staions and giving statements, the chance that 'I' will also be breathalyzed, and the knowledge of how much grief I am going to go through sorting out another car, there is a very strong urge to choke the life out of the other driver involved. I wonder how a plea of diminshed responsibility due to shock would work for me?

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