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Thread: New year... new car?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
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    892

    Default New year... new car?

    Are you planning to buy a new car in 2014? Our latest newsletter has a feature by The Sunday Times' Andrew Frankel previewing the best models for the new year and a look back at what was great in 2013.

    http://clubmagazine.rac.co.uk/GB/aut.../motoring-news

    Let us know what you think!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
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    Don't think I would buy a new car based on what the motoring press say. Rather like needing some remote press guy to tell you what suit to wear. Some idea of reliability might not be bad, but there will not be any information for the new model year because any faults are yet to develop. Like most other commodities, buying a car is all down to what suits the one who will be using it. Personally, I'm a little tired of this group of know-alls who think we are unable to make an informed decision without their glib ramblings.

    Having said that, after two new cars, I will never again buy new. Not because of any bad experiences, but simply because a car of between one and two years old can be had for a heck of a lot lower price, and be just as good as a new one. Buying from a franchised dealer is just as safe as buying new, and there are two favourable points:
    (a) someone else carries the brunt of depreciation from the new price, and (b) the time factor from a new model coming into the public domain means a good chance of any weaknesses being known.

  3. #3
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    I've always thought that one year old cars were a bit expensive, as you see them on offer at only 1000 to 1500 less than a new one?

    The best time to buy, seems to be at Three year old, as that's when most of the depreciation has gone, and they are coming up for the first MOT, and there always plenty to chose from.

  4. #4
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    Feb 2007
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    I'd not buy a new car again and not just because I can't afford it! Both previous posters have pointed out my views.

    Looking at the cars suggested, none of them are in any way practical for me and many folks I know so I suspect Mr Frankel lives in a very different world and that's why, I'd echo Snowball's words about so-called experts. For a starters, lacking in ground clearance!! Nos. 1, 2 and 3 just don't have the space potential required and I wouldn't be seen dead in a BMW or a Merc! I may drive what's perceived as a Chelsea Tractor (though a Freelander doesn't seem to be often included in this category but I drive it because it's practical and does the job - it's also fun to drive!

    On the subject of so-called experts, I would like to suggest that the greeny politicians who hammer folks like me on VED and all want us to drive small twee eco-cars get their backsides out around the rural parts of the country and find out just why a lot of us have cars like mine or pick-ups, etc. I think I must have taken about 20 fridges or washing m/cs to the tip just up the road in my car because the person who needs it shifting has got a wee car and can't fit it in!

    Oh, forgot, the BMW would be totally useless with our lifestyle here with it's pathetic mileage!

  5. #5
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    Apr 2007
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    FJ, I think these "ideal car experts" live in Fairyland, and look at those of us who buy a practical motor as if we have two heads!
    For the average Joe, owning and running a car is not a cheap matter, so getting it right for oneself is a priority.

  6. #6
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    I have just last week replaced my old used car with another used car. Simply because of the running costs. I want something of a known quantity, rather than a shiny new model full of 'bells and whistles' I hear too many stories of the failings of new cars, and the fact that the garage trade have no idea of how they work in the first place, meaning they can never repair them correctly. As for Design Engineers, they listen to closely to the bean-counters in terms of production costs. I want a car that is put together properly and that I can drive whilst sitting straight in the car. I have no interest in having to twist my legs to get to the pedals, and my torso to get hold of the steering wheel. Nor, for that matter, do I want a Lifetime Guarantee which only seems to last for the period the model is in production, or a 10-yr warranty, that excludes more and more components each passing year.

  7. #7
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    Three years old is an important milestone, because that's when most company owned cars are sold. They may have a relatively high mileage, but they are nearly always well maintained, and as mentioned above, the depreciation curve will have started to flatten out. Modern cars will last 20 years if looked after, so there is nothing other than fashion to make us want a 'new' car.

  8. #8
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    Aye! they always make the New Latest model look more desirable, or fill it with more gadgets. which no body can fix, (as mentioned earlier)
    We have had 3 new cars when we used Mobility cars, and don't get me wrong, its a great feeling, but I would have been really worried if we had to pay to get all the niggles sorted out, and pay for all them services they insist giving new cars.

    I'm happy with the old car we have now, and have got attached to it, but not enough to get rid of it when it starts costing us load of money to keep on the road.

  9. #9
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    Local to myself, I am afraid there is definitely an element of 'Keeping Up With The Jones's'. Generally, my car is the oldest in the area, but it's mine, paid cash for. I see for myself, that the majority of cars disappear at 7 - 7.30am, return at around 6-ish pm, and don't move until the same time next day. I know some don't go out, because they just can't afford it because of mortgages, other bills, and paying the finance on 'their' car.

  10. #10
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    Aye! that's exactly right, our is bought and paid for, as is our flat, but I can remember when I worked offshore, our cars were parked in a secure area, near the heli-port.

    You should have seen my workmates almost crying, as our cars were covered in seagull c*ap, after being parked there for 2 weeks?

    As they had posh cars, like Mercs, BMWs and the like, and I had an old 7 year old Ford Cortina, so it never bothered me.

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