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Thread: Cycling Fatalities... What should be done about them?

  1. #21
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    It is an unfortunate fact of life that we tend to see the bad, even though the good does outweigh it quite considerably. The problem is that it is the bad which tends to get the majority of knee-jerk reactions from the powers-that-be either with more regulations or restrictions put upon the majority who do not deserve it. So we all end up 'suffering' for the actions of the few. The simple answer would be to either educate or penalise the few, but the bean-counters always raise the cry of cost! Again, it would be the majority of the good that would pay for the errant ways of the bad. Can't win either way. Of course, we could just put the bad in a leaky tub, send it out into the North Sea, and scupper it, but apparently even the bad have Human Rights.

  2. #22
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    Dennis W

    I believe that cyclists should have to pass a test and need to carry cycling licences.

    I also believe that either the bicycle OR the rider needs to carry a registration number or an ID number so that offenders can be prosecuted.
    Oh come on! Bicycles are just a cheap form of fun transport - lets keep it that way!
    Theres a bit 'o' fun in rescuing some old 'Vintage/Classic' Cycle out the scrap/off the rubbish tip and then 're-commissioning' it with new tyres,tubes, brakes and sometimes a lick of paint.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by WRX._.GTi View Post
    Oh come on! Bicycles are just a cheap form of fun transport - lets keep it that way!
    Theres a bit 'o' fun in rescuing some old 'Vintage/Classic' Cycle out the scrap/off the rubbish tip and then 're-commissioning' it with new tyres,tubes, brakes and sometimes a lick of paint.
    Not when they are on the roads (or pavements for that matter) they ain't!
    Stupid behaviour when around moving traffic is madness, and they can get hurt - or even DEAD.
    Also, any injuries to them, even if their (the cyclists') own fault, they can claim off a driver's insurance. That should change, and cyclists made responsible for their own actions.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by WRX._.GTi View Post
    Oh come on! Bicycles are just a cheap form of fun transport - lets keep it that way!
    Theres a bit 'o' fun in rescuing some old 'Vintage/Classic' Cycle out the scrap/off the rubbish tip and then 're-commissioning' it with new tyres,tubes, brakes and sometimes a lick of paint.
    I'd happily swap my bike for my old sit up and beg one with Sturmey Archer gears! I hate the modern ones.

    However, however tongue in cheek you are - and I'm a vintage car enthusiast(!) - many of the issues are, I regret to say, not fun!

  5. #25
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    ^
    Do swap it! Old bikes can be had for the price of a round of drinks and the frames are much more solid!

  6. #26
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    ficklejade
    ... with Sturmey Archer gears! I hate the modern ones.

    However, however tongue in cheek you are - and I'm a vintage car enthusiast(!)
    So you also probably know Raleigh owned Sturmey Archer, that Sturmey Archer also made gearbox units and thay Raleigh made Cars, Motorcycles and Three-Wheelers.

  7. #27
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    "I'd happily swap my bike for my old sit up and beg one with Sturmey Archer gears! I hate the modern ones."


    Derailleur gears have been around from the time plonk and Sturmey Archer, came later and actually had a derailleur gears extra add on in the 60's. The first derailleur gears were changed by hand on the chain. Now they are electronic and changed by the brake lever as cars, with paddle shift. Very accurate changes compared to the old Benelux, Huret and Campagnolo. All this was brought about by Shimano. Personally I always raced on Campagnolo gears. Sturmey Archer also made the gearing for the Heath Radcliffe operating theatre ventilator and many gas cooker burners. Now alas Sturmey Archer is no more.

  8. #28
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    I still remember in my youth taking different hubs apart and trying to find my 'perfect' set of Sturmey Archer ratios. The last bicycle I bought, in the early 90s, had eighteen gears. Six cogs on the wheel, and three on the crank. Biggest mistake I ever made concerning bicycles, as there were just too many, and I ended up using probably 3 or 4.

  9. #29
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    Trainman;
    Derailleur gears have been around from the time plonk and Sturmey Archer, came later and actually had a derailleur gears extra add on in the 60's. The first derailleur gears were changed by hand on the chain. Now they are electronic and changed by the brake lever as cars, with paddle shift. Very accurate changes compared to the old Benelux, Huret and Campagnolo. All this was brought about by Shimano. Personally I always raced on Campagnolo gears. Sturmey Archer also made the gearing for the Heath Radcliffe operating theatre ventilator and many gas cooker burners. Now alas Sturmey Archer is no more.
    Now this is an interesting piece, however from what I know Sturmey Archer (and I also believe the one part of the 'S A' name is actually NOT one of the founders but the name of a journalist!) three-speed/gear hub systems came out around 1900 which ended up in the post war years as the 'AW' Hub version. Also there was Four Speed if you paid more (can't remember name of that hub 'code' designation - and I should do as I have a Bicycle with this 'extra'). Regarding derailleur gears I thought these did not appear until the 1920's.
    Of course Sturmey Archer was owned by Raleigh Cycles of Nottingham (named after a Street) and other items are found to have their name on such as refectors and lamps etc.
    You state Sturmey Archer do not exist anymore ... this I did not know for I still see 'S A' branded items - such as drum brakes which are proving quite popular with people building certain 'Retro' bicycles.

  10. #30
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    Rolebama
    I still remember in my youth taking different hubs apart and trying to find my 'perfect' set of Sturmey Archer ratios. The last bicycle I bought, in the early 90s, had eighteen gears. Six cogs on the wheel, and three on the crank. Biggest mistake I ever made concerning bicycles, as there were just too many, and I ended up using probably 3 or 4.
    Those Sturmer Archer hubs regardless of age can be a right 'Chinese puzzle' of parts; well I think so anyway!

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