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Thread: New Car

  1. #1
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    Default New Car

    Hello
    Can anyone tell me how long you expect to wait for a new car to be in your hands once you have paid your deposit, the car in question is being built in EUROPE. The car in question is a VW UP john
    Last edited by john hands; 27-07-13 at 13:53.

  2. #2
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    It just depends on a variety of factors, I guess?

    IF it was a "hand made" car such as Rolls Royce build then it could take 12 months or so..

  3. #3
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    A lot depends on the colour you have chosen. Manufacturers paint in job lots, so if your colour is next in line, you would have a shorter wait. Similarly, if you have 'customized' your car, you could be on a longer waiting list. Best people to ask are the dealer.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rolebama View Post
    A lot depends on the colour you have chosen. Manufacturers paint in job lots, so if your colour is next in line, you would have a shorter wait. Similarly, if you have 'customized' your car, you could be on a longer waiting list. Best people to ask are the dealer.
    That may once upon a time have been the case, but I think these days it doesn't matter so much.

    Does the OP know which plant in which country his or her car is being manufactured in?

  5. #5
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    Welcome to the site John, I'm sure the dealer you are buying the car form will be able to tell you exactly how long it will be before your car arrives, good luck.

  6. #6
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    Dennis, I don't know where you live but here on Planet Earth cars are painted in batches, and no longer will a major manufacturer do a 'one-off' to hasten delivery times. Sure, the specialist market will, but then you have a waiting list because of the time taken to build.

  7. #7
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    Thumbs up

    Actually, I really think that you have not been in a car factory recently, and do not understand the current manufacturing process.

    Some vehicles tend to be a standard colour, like Land Rover Defenders for example.

    I believe that with computerised production those body parts of a certain colour can be taken to the "tracks" as we used to call them on an automatic conveyor belt.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rolebama View Post
    Dennis, I don't know where you live but here on Planet Earth cars are painted in batches, and no longer will a major manufacturer do a 'one-off' to hasten delivery times. Sure, the specialist market will, but then you have a waiting list because of the time taken to build.
    The body parts are "painted" in a separate shop from the production line. It is quite possible in these days of automated car production for different coloured cars to be adjacent to each other on the production or assembly line.

  9. #9
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    Dennis is almost right.

    All parts on a car are sprayed before final assembly. The underbody and sub frames are usually black and arrive in the factory ready sprayed, as do matching trim such as bumpers and mirror bodies. The external colour is sprayed on to the body shell, assembled with doors, bonnet and boot, in an automatic spray booth. Changing the colour in a booth is a major job, so they do run bodies through in batches and store them. They will, of course have more than one spray booth, so I imagine that the more popular colours (red, black, white) are run permanently, and the less popular (yellow?) in batches.

    Scheduling the parts (including body shells) on the production line is a highly sophisticated operation. All the parts required to create a car have to be at the correct station on the trackside in the correct order. I don't know what the current lead time is to manufacture a specific model, but it will be hours and not weeks. As the dealers enter orders on to the system the computer checks a comprehensive parts list. If all the parts are available, it will reserve them and put them in a build schedule. With modern just-in-time systems this involves suppliers assembly lines as well.

    Once the build is prepared, the parts start to flow. Some of them will come from hundreds of miles away, even another country, but all will be in the correct sequence for the final build. Because the system is so sophisticated there is no need to build a run of black Ghias followed by blue XLs. So what Dennis refers to is that you will see cars on the production line in apparently random colours and trim levels.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZXWyh3FzuB4

    Just so you know, I have toured most of the UK production line, although that was some while ago. I even visited the celebrated Mini line at Longbridge that was considered too dangerous for tourists.
    Last edited by Santa; 28-07-13 at 18:10.

  10. #10
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    Many manufacturers do not use conventional "spraying" these days. It is some sort of elctro phoretic (If I remember the word correctly) Apparently it is more even than "spraying"

    Thank you Santa for your support. (I will always wear it)


    I visited the Triumph car factory in Coventry (about 50 years ago )

    and my cousin visited the Rolls Royce factory at Crewe where the cars were hand made.
    Last edited by Dennis W; 28-07-13 at 18:22.

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