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Thread: RAC Report on Motoring 2013

  1. #1
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    Default RAC Report on Motoring 2013

    The RAC have released their annual Report on Motoring. In this, the 25th edition, the report looks back at the past quarter of a century at attitudes and opinion on the UK’s roads.

    And with 30 million drivers relying on their cars for day-to-day transport, the report also looks at the key issues facing the motoring population in 2013.
    • The cost of motoring
    • The state of road maintenance
    • Motorway speed limits
    • Young drivers
    • Road safety

    The RAC will be actively talking to those that make decisions in Government about the concerns of motorists in these key areas.

    Do you have an opinion about the findings from the report? Let us know what you think in this thread, or the other 'your opinion' threads on the site!

    Click here to have a look at the full report: http://www.rac.co.uk/advice/reports-on-motoring/

  2. #2
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    There could be a "curfew" of say 10.00 pm on young drivers ( or for 12 months after young drivers have passed the driving test).

    Young drivers should face an annual driving test, perhaps?

  3. #3
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    Unfortunately, I never kept a diary of costs incurred running my previous cars, but I am pretty certain that my cars of the last ten years have cost a higher percentage of my income. I know prices go up, but I think they have gone up beyond what is reasonable. I do know that in the early to mid '80s, running my cars was a reasonable percentage of my wages, and even then we were complaining of being 'cash cows' for the Govt in many ways.
    As for the state of the roads, you would have to be either stupid or drunk to think they are in any way in a reasonable condition, yet money can still be found for ramps and chicanes. Here's an idea - fix the roads first.
    Motorway speed limits seem to work, it is those that either exceed or run below a sensible speed that cause the problems.
    Young drivers are always going to be there, but education would go a long way to help them survive. Such education would include discipline and teaching of respect. Who knows - it might even lead to self-discipline and self-respect.
    As to road safety, it will only ever be as safe as the most dangerous drivers out there, and there are far too many. We need a sustained Police presence on the roads. Without commitment to this those that spout about road safety are just that - spouting.

  4. #4
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    For what it's worth - I scanned through the report and found it interesting. No doubt such reports help shape futute decisions about motoring.

    The item that caught my eye was this:
    Approximately 800,000 car-owning
    households are spending at least
    27% of their disposable income on
    buying and running a car and, of a
    total maximum weekly expenditure
    of £167, £44 goes to vehiclerelated
    expenses such as fuel,
    insurance, tax and repair and
    maintenance costs.
    27% of their disposable income???

    Also I noted that a third of all motorists do less than 6000 miles a year.
    Last edited by Santa; 12-06-13 at 16:45.

  5. #5
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    I think that road policing is starting to be done by "bobbies in cars" once again, where as a few years ago, it was mostly done remotely by cameras.

    No point in bringing curfew times for younger drivers, or making up more laws, as its hard enough for the police just now to enforce the laws that already exist?

    As for the cost of driving, I think it has increased more than most other things over the years, and that successive governments , including the present now, are trying to price the masses off the roads. So that motoring will once again, be available only for those who can afford it.

  6. #6
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    The 800,000 who spend so much on their cars, I wonder if they are running cars they just can't afford. I know that locally to me, most of the houses have cars that are less than 5yrs old. I don't believe for one minute that they are any better off than me but I do believe that most of them are there as status symbols. I also notice that they no longer disappear during the evenings, leading me to assume they don't go out as much as they used to. Perhaps their budgets can't stretch to running a car and socializing?

  7. #7
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    That may well be because they don't drink and drive these days. I do agree about the status symbol though - Although (or maybe because) I was a fleet manager, I have very little interest in cars as a topic of conversation. To me a car is a tool - I like my tools sharp and working as they should, but care little if they look old and shabby.

  8. #8
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    Quote......" I know that locally to me, most of the houses have cars that are less than 5yrs old."

    Aye! and most of them will be on finance of some kind. A mate of mine bought a new car on a deal with a £99 deposit, he had to take out extra insurance on the finance alone?

    Personally, I would rather have an older car, bought and paid for, then a newer one with a lot of finance owing on it.

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