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Thread: Working on your car in the street

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
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    Hello! I joined this forum only because Google, running my query, pulled up Hometune's post in this thread. I'm helping my partner set up as a mobile mechanic in Devon, and we'd like to offer "at home or at work" service, rather than just restrict ourselves to working on private driveways only. I'd be really grateful for any tips regarding doing so, as it looks like a very grey area. Other than the CNEA(2005) mentioned above, what else should we take heed of? Is there a specific trade body we (as a company) should join, or any specific authorities to register with? Many thanks in advance!

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Middlesex
    Posts
    8,509

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    The only thing I would add to Hometune's advice, is that when working on private property other than that owned by the broken down party, is that you may have to seek permission to enter and carry out work. The liability aspect of Health and Safety may be an issue for some companies when it comes to working on cars on their property. (I came across a few instances when working for the AA when I was told I could not work on broken down cars in company owned car parks. Had to tow them onto the street.)
    Also, depending on what hours they plan to work, it may be worth contacting the Council Environment Officer as I also received complaints about noise after 'normal working hours'.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
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    Thank you Rolebama. I suppose the situation would dictate who to approach for permission, there isn't a specific job role for it that would be the same across different companies?

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
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    Middlesex
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    Just ask the person who has broken down to make sure it is OK to work on the car on company premises.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
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    2,788

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    While I don't doubt that a landowner could refuse permission for you to work on their land, I suspect that the best course would not be to ask first.

    I can imagine that in many workplaces there would be an automatic refusal. No individual would want to be held responsible if anything went wrong. On the other hand, if you just go on with the job, assuming that the car park was open access, then you would probably be finished before anyone took any action to stop you.

    In general, if a customer asked you to come to their workplace, then I suggest that you advise them to ask permission as it would be easier for them, and a lot less hassle for you. The service you offer is becoming more commonplace these days, so some companies will have a policy - yea or nay.

    As an aside - You should pay a lot of attention to your website. This is where a lot of your business will come from, so it should look professional, but not too slick, if you know what I mean. I should clearly give an address and phone number (preferably a landline as well as a mobile) and an e-mail address as well.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    8,616

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    Why don't you phone up another firm in a different part of the UK, and ask them how they handle such things, cant hurt to phone, I mean its not like you are going to start up in their area, good luck.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
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    I agree with Smudger. If it was me - I would try to find an existing trader - in Bristol maybe - and pick their brains.

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