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Thread: Fog Lights.

  1. #21
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    Previously fog lights were mounted low down so that when used in fog, the light did not reflect back directly into the driver's eyes. If they are above 600mm (2 feet) then the modern design must have overcome this?

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Santa View Post
    I do not believe that lights four feet from the ground could be construed as fog lights but that is what the regulations say.

    They also say they must not be "Used so as to cause undue dazzle or discomfort to other persons using the road" or "used so as to be lit at any other time other than in conditions of seriously reduced visibility."
    Unless they mount them on the roof, I doubt it is possible to mount them 1200mm from the ground on cars but, you have to remember that it is possible to mount them this high on commercial vehicles - Snow ploughs spring to mind where the lights have to be mounted above the plough and not forgetting that certain specialist vehicles are excluded from some of the regs.

    I've read the regs many times before, I used to take alot of vehicles for SVA tests at VOSA test centres.

  3. #23
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    To be honest - in all the years I have been driving I have never found front fog lights any use whatsoever. I do get peed off at drivers who don't switch them off. Rear fog lights are a good thing when used correctly - front one are a waste of space.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Santa View Post
    To be honest - in all the years I have been driving I have never found front fog lights any use whatsoever. I do get peed off at drivers who don't switch them off. Rear fog lights are a good thing when used correctly - front one are a waste of space.
    From memory, I remember the fog lights of years back being flat beamed and often set at a slight angle so as to illuminate the nearside kerb/verge, and intended to be used at relatively slow speeds. In those days we had the heavy smogs that do not now occur. In this respect, I think a combination of the thinner fogs and driving attitudes have developed to a point where Santa's opinion of the front ones being 'a waste of space' is a valid comment. The rear fogs are important though, if for nothing else than the fact that many drivers tend to hurtle through fog at unsafe speeds and rely on seeing anything in front in time. So, the earlier a vehicle shows up in fog (a situation to which rear fog lights contribute) the better.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowball View Post
    From memory, I remember the fog lights of years back being flat beamed and often set at a slight angle so as to illuminate the nearside kerb/verge, and intended to be used at relatively slow speeds. In those days we had the heavy smogs that do not now occur. In this respect, I think a combination of the thinner fogs and driving attitudes have developed to a point where Santa's opinion of the front ones being 'a waste of space' is a valid comment. The rear fogs are important though, if for nothing else than the fact that many drivers tend to hurtle through fog at unsafe speeds and rely on seeing anything in front in time. So, the earlier a vehicle shows up in fog (a situation to which rear fog lights contribute) the better.
    You mean when they used to have yellow lenses and were impossible to confuse with driving lamps? Modern fog lights have a very short cut off point with a wide beam to highlight kerbs. I have them on my car and have only used them a few times in fog. Like you say we don't often have fog now.

    I'm not sure I'd class them as a 'waste of space' you don't HAVE to use them all the time just because they are fitted but, It is nice to know they are there for times when you might need them.

  6. #26
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    [QUOTE=Snowball;88098]From memory, I remember the fog lights of years back being flat beamed and often set at a slight angle so as to illuminate the nearside kerb/verge, and intended to be used at relatively slow speeds. In those days we had the heavy smogs that do not now occur. In this respect, I think a combination of the thinner fogs and driving attitudes have developed to a point where Santa's opinion of the front ones being 'a waste of space' is a valid comment. The rear fogs are important though, if for nothing else than the fact that many drivers tend to hurtle through fog at unsafe speeds and rely on seeing anything in front in time. So, the earlier a vehicle shows up in fog (a situation to which rear fog lights contribute) the better.[/QUOTE
    They still need to be flat-beamed, or more accurately to point slightly downward. The regs say "... so aimed that the upper edge of the beam is, as near as practicable, 3 per cent below the horizontal ..."

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by TC1474 View Post
    You do not get an NIP for a lighting offence.

    The road vehicle lighting regs are quite specific. Anything below a certain height (I cannot recall the exact measurement, but generally below the front bumper) is regarded as a front facing fog light, and therefore if it is used in anything other than conditions of adverse visibility, then the offence of improper use of fog lights is committed.
    Why do the police not stop and question and breath-test aqnd caution the boy-racers who improperly and illegally use fog lights and driving spots incorrectly?

  8. #28
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    Because, as taxpayers we, according to the government, do not want to see our taxes wasted on such matters.

  9. #29
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    Some forces do, A friend of mines son got stopped and fined for having washer jets that illuminated green.

  10. #30
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    I the past, newpaper articles have referred to drivers being prosecuted for driving with fog lights on when conditions are not foggy. One woman was even prosecuted for being in clear conditions where the fog was in patches. My car brochure shows models in the higher ranges as having these lights (I elected not to have them), and they are described as "fog lights". But, although similarly situated, some vehicle manufacturers describe them as 'driving lights'. Whether there are lens/bulb differences regarding description, I don't know.
    What has happened is that ambiguity over time seems to have caused a void in the knowledge of both authority and the public as to exactly what these lights are, and the correct use of them.
    From a safety point of view, it appears that vehicle lighting has developed into a battleground between drivers, with many instances where headlights, even on 'dip', are blinding to oncoming drivers, and the fog/driving lights are also switched on for additional effect. "The brighter the lights, the faster one can drive", seems to be the order of the day; and badly adjusted lights increase the problem.
    Someof the bulbs employed are obviously illegal because of their power, but the owners simply change these for MoT purposes, then refit them afterwards. It may be that authority is aware of the problem, but conveniently do or say nothing, because addressing the issue would demand the kind of enforcing effort which is too frightening for 'authority' to contemplate.

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