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Thread: Should you use Warning Triangles on Motorways?

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rolebama View Post
    I have seen the effect of the slipstream of passing vehicles on warning triangles. They are not heavy enough to withstand that 'wind'. I would advise to get as far away from the broken down vehicle as practical, whilst awaiting assistance. I would also agree with the argument about if they cannot see a broken down vehicle, they ain't gonna see a triangle.
    The broken down vehicle may not have any lights illuminated.

  2. #12
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    It will have reflectors and an alert driver will see it. If he can't see them - he won't see a triangle.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Santa View Post
    It will have reflectors and an alert driver will see it. If he can't see them - he won't see a triangle.
    A Warning Triangle can give advance warning of an unexpected hazard. Why do you think they are compulsory in some countries? and some organisations insist that their entire vehicle fleet carries them.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Santa View Post
    It will have reflectors and an alert driver will see it. If he can't see them - he won't see a triangle.
    It SHOULD have reflectors, but as you should be aware, Drivers need to expect the unexpected. So Hazard warning triangles can be a life saver. But one hardly ever sees them deployed.

  5. #15
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    Have you actually worked on the hard shoulder of a motorway? It is a very scary place to be. At night, you will be attending a broken down car and despite the flashing beacons on your truck giving at least a mile's warning, none of the traffic moves over to the middle lane. They all carry on at 70mph passing within feet of you and the car. It is seriously dangerous, day or night. The breakdown services always tell you to get over the crash barrier immediately and up the bank if possible, out of harm's way.
    There is no way on this earth I would be walking along the hard shoulder, day or night, to put a silly little piece of plastic on the road risking my life in the process.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hometune View Post
    Have you actually worked on the hard shoulder of a motorway? It is a very scary place to be. At night, you will be attending a broken down car and despite the flashing beacons on your truck giving at least a mile's warning, none of the traffic moves over to the middle lane. They all carry on at 70mph passing within feet of you and the car. It is seriously dangerous, day or night. The breakdown services always tell you to get over the crash barrier immediately and up the bank if possible, out of harm's way.
    There is no way on this earth I would be walking along the hard shoulder, day or night, to put a silly little piece of plastic on the road risking my life in the process.
    Exactly. But why would anyone listen to people like yourself who have done the job, or the breakdown services, or the Highway Code, when Dennis know better?

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beelzebub View Post
    Exactly. But why would anyone listen to people like yourself who have done the job, or the breakdown services, or the Highway Code, when Dennis know better?
    If you notice the post which I was replying to you will see that the thread had digressed slightly from Motorways to just the use of hazard warning triangles generally on all roads. It is very rare to see hazard warning triangles deployed on our roads. And they can save lives. When it can take breakdown or recovery services more than an hour to reach a disabled vehicle. correct and appropriate use of hazard warning triangles should be practised more.

  8. #18
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    Any motorist will see a car on the hard shoulder at night, providing they are awake. If they are asleep, it doesn't matter what you do in terms of safety, it is a waste of time. Unfortunately, I have had an AA vehicle very badly damaged by an articulated unit and trailer because the driver fell asleep at the wheel. He admitted this, not only to myself, but also to the Police when they arrived. Falling asleep is also believed to be a factor in a number of fatalities involving hard shoulders at night, but almost impossible to prove.
    In terms of the original thread, I agree that the risk involved in putting out a triangle, on a motorway hard shoulder, is too high to be worth doing.
    My experience of working motorways at night extends to being a Night Patrol for the AA for ten years, working the M25, M3, M4, M1, M40, M10 and M41.( The M10 and M41 have now been downgraged to an A classification.) Including doing breakdowns for other garages, this extends to around a twenty year period.

  9. #19
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    I just had this vision of a bloke walking along the hard shoulder, about to be wiped out by a wayward 40 tonner, holding up the triangle in his hand. Rather like a cross against Dracula. My only excuse is I was in Whitby a while back...

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by wagolynn View Post
    My only excuse is I was in Whitby a while back...
    .....and the name of the pub? Wasn't The World's End by any chance.....? (this pub does sexist in Whitby)

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