Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 33

Thread: Why You Should Reverse Park in Car Parks

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    295

    Default

    Snowball
    One thing I would say about MPV's is this; when you are getting on in years they are certainly more comfortable to drive than the average normal car.
    I can actually tell you a happy story there - a neighbour of mine who is in his '90's and still drives fine, but quite understandably 'struggles' to walk and move a bit, saw me pull up and an old 'proper' MG Sports car. He said "could he 'go for a spin in it?" to which I was most happy to - but I thought he might struggle getting in - he struggles to get into his own little hatchback (infact younger people seem to struggle to get into classic british sports cars due the the angle of the door and seat position etc!) - yet he came over and a 'as quick as a flash he 'slipped in' as if he was back 50 years ago!.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    2,917

    Default

    A bit off topic I know, but some years ago I was evaluating cars for use in homes for handicapped people. Finacial constrainst meant that the cars had to be unmodified and I arranged a series of demonstrations.

    In practice we found that the important factors were; how wide the doors opened, and how high the car was. Some cars were just impossible if a passenger had to be helped in and out and cars that were too low slung were no good because the passenger couldnt get the leverage to get out.

    We found that three door cars were better for the front seat passenger because the front doors open wide, but they were impractical for obvious reasons, and MVPs and 4WD cars were too high off the ground. The back doors on most cars are pretty small and often don't open very wide at all.

    We did find a compromise at the time but that car is long since out of production. My Mondeo is pretty good, but the back doors are small as usual. One device we found useful was a swiveling pad that the passenger sat on. This meant that it was much easier to turn them and get their feet inside.

    In my youth I owned a Triumph Spitfire. When I went home in it my father asked; "when are you going to get one for the other foot then?"

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    2,707

    Default

    I usually try to park away from other vehicles if the car park has sufficient spare places. Several months ago I parked at one of the Service areas on the M6 and IIRC on an end of row space with an empty space on the other side. When I returned to my car another car had parked in the adjacent space, and the driver was getting in to his car at the same time as I was. As I was getting in to my car my door bumper strip touched the rubber strip on his precious little darling car. At that he wound his window down and asked me if I had bumped his car. So I told him that it was the rubber strips which had touched.

    If he did not want the door to be bumped then he should not have parked so close to me, should he?

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    8,695

    Default

    Sounds like the kind of bloke who would put a claim in, if he thought he could get away with it?

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    3

    Default

    I was advised by the police to drive directly into a bay because if a thief gains access to the vehicle he is faced with many combinations of selecting Reverse Gear. Cars can have Reverse at either side of the 'gate', you may have to push the gearstick down to engage, you may have to lift and move the gearstick to engage, Often there is a concealed (behind the stick) lever which is not obvious to a newby. Any delay to the thief adds panic and could be the difference between getting nabbed or escaping. First gear (if you've reversed in) is simple to locate and ensures a quick getaway.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    2,917

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rayanmar View Post
    I was advised by the police to drive directly into a bay because if a thief gains access to the vehicle he is faced with many combinations of selecting Reverse Gear. Cars can have Reverse at either side of the 'gate', you may have to push the gearstick down to engage, you may have to lift and move the gearstick to engage, Often there is a concealed (behind the stick) lever which is not obvious to a newby. Any delay to the thief adds panic and could be the difference between getting nabbed or escaping. First gear (if you've reversed in) is simple to locate and ensures a quick getaway.
    Sounds like your policeman was talking out of his helmet. Any self-respecting car thief would know exactly where reverse is. Anothr areguement for reversing in is that you can get away easily if you feel threatened. That said - I still think driving in is best.
    Last edited by Santa; 04-05-12 at 23:20.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Onich, Lochaber
    Posts
    90

    Default

    I'm fortunate enough to live in a comparatively low-crime area (Lochaber, in the Scottish Highlands), and (being a retired Policeman) I reverse into a parking space whenever possible as I then have better visibility coming out, but I do agree that it is easier to load shopping into the back of a car that has been driven nose first into a space. Mind you, my local supermarket's parking bays are generally not conducive to reverse parking: maybe we should all write to our respective local supermarkets to change their parking lot layouts to favour reversing into parking bays? Just a thought! Actually, I'm composing a letter to mine anyway on their layout (which I, and many others, think could be considerably improved): maybe I'll just toss these comments in as well!

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    8,695

    Default

    The only down side of reversing into a bay, is the risk of damage to your car from folk who cant even control a shopping trolley, let alone a car, as they have to go through the space in between the cars?

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Onich, Lochaber
    Posts
    90

    Default

    And, having read the assorted "crime prevention" comments in previous posts which seem to contradict each other, my simple advice would be:- a) drive or reverse into parking spaces to suit yourself (just don't take up more than one space!), and b) take your car keys with you and lock the car doors until you return: let's face it, how long is the average shopping trip?

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Onich, Lochaber
    Posts
    90

    Default

    Smudger, nobody ever said that the most sensible way was the easiest: why do you think so many people don't do it?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •