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Thread: Employee changing a spare wheel on company vehicle

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by smudger View Post
    Quote....."In addition, If the driver can safely change the wheel at the roadside, then the vehicle can quickly remove itself from further danger in a shorter length of time"

    Well according to those "Police Camera Action" type of TV programs, there is no where safe on the fringes of any motorways..
    As far as I can recall, I have changed two spare wheels on Motorway hard shoulders. One on the M56, a land rover defender. Then a long time ago, A Hillman Avenger on the M5 or M6.

    More recently I tried to change the wheel on a Ford Fiesta on the M1, but I had to call one of the breakdown services, and they took more than an hour to arrive. A Police Motorway Patrol did stop to help at one point, but the carrier holding the spare wheel was siezed up. Luckily that happened where the hard shoulder was double the usual width.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis W View Post
    Surely the chances of that happening are minimal?
    Not according to the insurance industry statistics.
    Jacks provided by vehicle manufacturers are designed for use in ideal conditions.
    My neighbour managed to damage his car with the jack; he also took the wheel nuts off before jacking the car resulting in more damage to the body. When I noticed him, he had put two wheel nuts on, as he was, "only going to the tyre place to deliver the punctured wheel”.
    One driver at work thought he would save time; he tried to hit the wheel brace with a large rock to free the wheel nut. The result was broken spectacles when the brace flew off the nut.

  3. #23
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    Quote..." he also took the wheel nuts off before jacking the car resulting in more damage to the body."

    Aye! that's not a good thing to do, I loosen the wheel nuts before jacking the car up, that way you are not going to apply too much pressure when the car is up on the jack, as that would pull it off the jack..

  4. #24
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    I think that’s were people get muddled Smudger, they half remember something about wheel nuts before jacking but take them off rather than just loosening them. With a new to me vehicle, I like to take a wheel off at home just to be sure what quirks there are for that vehicle.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by wagolynn View Post
    I would seek advice from your insurers (employers); I think they will be happier if your employees are told not to change wheels. Fleet cover is available from most roadside assistance companies (RAC etc.) and the national tyre companies.
    I just do not understand why you have such a negative attitude.

    If I was an Insurer I would be pleased that this company is making an effort to educate and train their staff to be able to change wheels in the correct manner.

  6. #26
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    Hi Dennis W,
    The problem is, in the real world, employers get ideas about training people and they do go through with it, usually in a group. The snags are, the training will not be repeated, and a new driver will not be trained before they are sent on the road.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by wagolynn View Post
    Hi Dennis W,
    The problem is, in the real world, employers get ideas about training people and they do go through with it, usually in a group. The snags are, the training will not be repeated, and a new driver will not be trained before they are sent on the road.
    My point exactly - also half of them will not pay any attention to the training because "I was changin wheels before you was born"; and those that do listen/watch will only half remember. Bear in mind that it may well be years before they need to actually do it.

    As an ex fleet manager I would never expect any driver to change a wheel. Under some circumstances I might well forbid them to.

  8. #28
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    Transits are a good example of untrained people who don't read the owners handbook. You can tell by the big dents in the sills

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Santa View Post
    My point exactly - also half of them will not pay any attention to the training because "I was changin wheels before you was born"; and those that do listen/watch will only half remember. Bear in mind that it may well be years before they need to actually do it.

    As an ex fleet manager I would never expect any driver to change a wheel. Under some circumstances I might well forbid them to.
    Do you change your own wheels on your own car? Would you advise your partner or children to change car wheels?

  10. #30
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    I suppose that any issues people may have about changing wheels, they could be forgotten about really quick ,when it comes to the time when you are stuck at the side of the road, on a cold wet and windy night, in the middle of nowhere.

    The choice is there,........will you......or wont you?

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