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Thread: Buying on line - payment taken when item not in stock.

  1. #31
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    Cheers for that Wagolynn, I just realised that we have never sold anything on Ebay, we have just bought items, so that's maybe why we have never been charged.

    It was good to see that chart however, as it gives us an idea of what to expect, thanks again

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by lMccarthy View Post
    That's why I don't like shopping online - you have no evidence the payment is made, so a better option is to order things online and pay for them upon delivery.
    This, as I see it, is only possible with firms like Argos, Curry's, etc., where you can order to collect from a specific store, then pay at the store checkout. To get most of the attractive on-line deals, payment by card is the only option. Some offer PayPal as an additional security feature.

    I keep a special on line debit account (currently holding only 20 in credit) and transfer a sum from my main account when I intend to order on line. This keeps my main account free from any exposure to the internet dealers. But there are quite a few on line sellers who carry little or no stock, and order from a main supplier when they themselves receive an order. Whilst this is probably not technically unlawful, I think distance selling regulations should be revised to make it a criminal offence not to advise a buyer that an item is not in stock, and enable the buyer to decide to wait or to go to another seller, before any money is taken.

  3. #33
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    Did anyone else see the recent 'Click' TV program (BBC news channel)? They were talking about security of money transactions on the internet. They were saying the latest nasty is something called 'Man in the browser' malware. It behaves rather like there is someone in the background manipulating your screen and input and output data to and from the internet. Say you are logging on to your bank, it may add to the banks normal login screen boxes for your account number and say pin number these it sends on to the criminals. Another attack can be made when you make a payment, it will note the details of the payment (amount who to etc.) but transmit to your bank a payment to their own bank account for whatever amount they choose. After you have confirmed the payment (for the amount and to whom you thought) then decide to look at your bank account, it will substitute, on your screen, the payment you thought you had just made. Whilst this is obviously criminal activity, the software has been well designed. The program said, if it is a known 'Man in the browser' most security software will block it but if it is a new version very few will spot it.
    The banks are working hard on foiling these attacks; one method is to change the layout of the log in screen and other screens, as the software has to know the layout. The banks say, ‘anyone caught by such software would be compensated, providing they had taken all reasonable precautions (up-to-date security).

  4. #34
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    There are always these stories about on line shopping and scare tactic's, but the truth is, on line shopping is becoming more popular all the time. Some folk, (like us) are disabled and cant get out to the shops as easily as others.

    We have been shopping and banking on line for years now and have always paid via Pay-Pal. Besides all the banks have a policy where if any customer does get ripped off or defrauded in any way, will get all monies returned to them by the bank, so that does tend to give confidence to anyone thinking about banking or shopping on line.


    If you pay by credit card on line, you are also covered by the credit card company against fraud and statuary consumer rights.

  5. #35
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    I have Googled a couple of websites that describe this virus. These seem to indicate that it is still necessary for you to enter additional personal details; which the falsified web page asks you to do. banks always advise that they never ask for such information, so the obvious answer is not to get trapped into disclosing it. Make a written note of any suspicious details, particularly the URL showing at the top of the screen, shut down your computer, and immediately phone your bank.
    It is worth remembering that there are thousands of users on the web at any one time. The chances of your own computer being hacked must be as unlikely as winning the lottery. Keeping away from dodgy websites is a wise precaution, and never open an email that you think might be suspicious.

    I am on Windows 7, and I frequently use the "sweep" facility to get rid of any email coming into my Inbox that I wish to stop in the future. I once got periodic emails from The Chap, and there was no unsubscribe facility. Using 'sweep' got rid of it.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by smudger View Post
    There are always these stories about on line shopping and scare tactic's, but the truth is, on line shopping is becoming more popular all the time. Some folk, (like us) are disabled and cant get out to the shops as easily as others.

    We have been shopping and banking on line for years now and have always paid via Pay-Pal. Besides all the banks have a policy where if any customer does get ripped off or defrauded in any way, will get all monies returned to them by the bank, so that does tend to give confidence to anyone thinking about banking or shopping on line.


    If you pay by credit card on line, you are also covered by the credit card company against fraud and statuary consumer rights.
    This is not a scare story Smudger, I am afraid it is a well documented fact. The banks say they will compensate for any losses but when you look into the terms and conditions, they have a get out clause. They all say, 'providing you have taken reasonable precautions and your security software is up to date'. Considering the number of posts we see on here where posters have not bothered to read the T&C and do not feel they should, I think the banks have to protect themselves.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowball View Post
    I have Googled a couple of websites that describe this virus. These seem to indicate that it is still necessary for you to enter additional personal details; which the falsified web page asks you to do. banks always advise that they never ask for such information, so the obvious answer is not to get trapped into disclosing it. Make a written note of any suspicious details, particularly the URL showing at the top of the screen, shut down your computer, and immediately phone your bank.
    Hi Snowball, the clever part of 'Man in the browser' software is it inserts itself between the user and the bank, within the user’s browser, therefore the URL will be the correct one for the bank. To the user, everything appears as normal, and cookies are exchanged with the bank hence to them, everything looks OK, the very slight delay in data exchange will appear as normal broadband variation.

  8. #38
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    Ah! its OK really, its not as if we have Thousands of pounds in the bank anyway, so if someone wants to hack in and pay my overdraft off, good luck to them.

    We just put enough in to cover what we have bought and the usual direct debits, so there is not a lot left for them to nick

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