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Thread: Renault - electric parking brake expense. Beware!!!

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
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    Angry crazy cars

    Quote Originally Posted by Rolebama View Post
    I am wondering if it is relevant to the amount of drivers who have not applied their handbrakes properly, and have had the brakes come off as the discs cooled?! I still wouldn't want this on my car though, I believe I am capable of applying a handbrake, and releasing it for hill starts etc.
    I take a lot of the so-called driver aids as a way of dumbing down driving.
    Hi , just new,I would like to share a recent experience; I recently took my Renault laguna (2005) for an mot retest and the car passed ok. I was given my mot certificate and thanked the inspector as i needed my car for work and was relieved to pass for another year. The work for the mot carried out to my car by another garage, cost me about £400. As I was getting my pass handed to me, I was told my car was being brought to me. 2 minutes later, Iwas told, ``they cant get my car off the ramp`` because the electric brake had locked on itself. The manual release would not work and the cables would not budge so both wheels had to be removed and the cable`` stop ``forced open with a large screwdriver to release the brake cables. I was told the electric brake box on the rear axle would need replacing at a cost of £800 fitted. Needless to say, I will run my car for 1 year then scrap it never to get a renault car ever again.:

  2. #2
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    Jul 2015
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    I've got same problem on mine can you please fix mine as well for same cost

  3. #3
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    Nov 2016
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    it a common issue that we come across we have extensive knowledge on these electric brake units the cables are one of the culprits they seize up another is the unit it self that the cables fit into inside is a motor small gearbox and a circuit board with relays.We have since last year been reconditioning these units and have a good understanding or what the common issues are .we also have in stock all renault electric hand brake cables which we have sourced that are not available from main dealer as come with complete units.Any one want some advice i will be glad to assist.

  4. #4
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    Apr 2007
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    I share Rolebama's feelings. I am perfectly happy to have a conventional, fully manual handbrake. Why do the car manufacturers have to fit these failure-prone extravagancies in cars? The more potential there is for something to go wrong, the less reliable the car is likely to be. Having applied and released the handbrake without problems for over 60 years, why the heck should I pay out for another technical knick-knack that compromises reliability AND is almost certain to incur abortive costs at some future date.
    ?

  5. #5
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    You would think they would carry out trials on a few experimental cars, before they went and fitted them into production cars?................. ....................... .............They should wait until they get the results from tests and carry out survays before they jump the gun and install gimmicks like that🙄

  6. #6
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    I would imagine a lot of development work went into electric parking brakes prior to being put on the market. Exhaustive proving is a statutory requirement. But, as with all things, there is no way of ensuring that faults will not develop. I work on the basis that if it isn't necessary then don't have it, and it won't be there to go wrong.
    When I bought my current car, the sales guy's first suggestion was that I would like self-parking. I told him that when I wasn't able to park the car myself, I would no longer be visiting car showrooms, or even driving.
    In choosing a car, I first look at the basic model and then decide what upgrade(s), if any, I would wish to have.
    I know several people who have bought top end motors and then hardly, if ever, use half of the toys they have paid for. How daft is that?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowball View Post
    I work on the basis that if it isn't necessary then don't have it, and it won't be there to go wrong.
    If everyone followed the same rule, we wouldn't have heaters, radios, indicators or more than three gears and we would still need a handle to start the engine. There are whole host of other things that, while not essential, add to the comfort and pleasure of driving.

    I assume that you use a handle to wind your windows up and down and that your current car has neither power assisted brakes or steering.

    When I bought my current car, the sales guy's first suggestion was that I would like self-parking. I told him that when I wasn't able to park the car myself, I would no longer be visiting car showrooms, or even driving.

    In choosing a car, I first look at the basic model and then decide what upgrade(s), if any, I would wish to have.
    I know several people who have bought top end motors and then hardly, if ever, use half of the toys they have paid for. How daft is that?
    When we bought our current car, we too had a list of things that were essential to us. Big enough to take the electric wheelchair for my wife and fully automatic gears were the first items on the list. This was followed by leather upholstery and electrically operated front seats with a memory for the two very different drivers. Add in a power tailgate and a rear view camera, and the available pool was shrinking to a puddle.

    The car we bought, a Ford Mondeo Titanium Estate has all those features, but also came with self parking which we do not have much use for. It also has other gadgets like an electric parking brake, automatic wipers and automatically dipping headlamps which are handy as well as heated seats and steering wheel which I have recently discovered to be a boon on a cold frosty morning.

    My point is that apart from those people who choose their cars purely for the prestige, there are many people who choose their cars because they are the best compromise between what they want and need, and what the manufacturers offer.

  8. #8
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    You are wrong about my views being a delay on technology advancing, Santa. Much of the technology used in cars had already been developed in other fields of engineering - the manufacturers have just adapted that technology to fit into the spectrum of car design.
    This has produced 'gadgetry' at several levels - some essential for ongoing safety and reliability in vehicles, some which are useful but not really necessary, and some that are downright unnecessary. I would put self-parking in the latter category, along with things like climatic zones within the cabin of a car. How stupid is it to believe that a driver can have one climate in his/her space, and another climate in the passenger seat? The individual movements of air will quickly combine as one.
    I would not decry any accessory where a driver/passenger really needed it, irrespective of whether it was for me or not, but some of the boys' toys in cars are no more useful than a bragging point at the pub and, in the longer term, result in a vehicle being more likely to need garage attention.

  9. #9
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    But who are you to dictate what it 'essential' and what is a 'boy's toy'? You are free to choose whatever car you like as I am. I do not want you or anyone else dictating what should be available, wherever and by whomever it was developed.

  10. #10
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    I'm not dictating anything, Santa, but with over 60 years of driving experience behind me I would like to think that I do know what is, and what is not, essential in a car, and what constitutes a "toy" rather than a truly useful piece of equipment.
    And I have based my opinion on common sense, Santa. Why have you switched from challenging the opinion to attacking the person?
    The number of non-driving frills in many "up market" cars have increased dramatically - mainly for money-making exercises to boost the egos of those with more money than sense.

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