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Thread: Advice needed with my new Ford Fiesta

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    Default Advice needed with my new Ford Fiesta

    I am after some help and advice with my new Ford Fiesta.
    I purchased a new Fiesta which was delivered at the end of Oct 2010. In Jan 2011 the battery warning light started to come on randomly and after a visit to the dealer a corroded wiring loom in the engine compartment was diagnosed. Ford changed this and insisted that a second loom was also changed. After 3 weeks the loom was found and after some confusion was dispatched a week later only to turn out to be the wrong part. As of this date Ford have still not supplied the spare part and have not given any indication of when it will be available. I am asking Ford to change the vehicle but they are refusing to do so. I have contacted Trading Standards and they advised a Sale of Goods Act letter which is on its way to Ford. Please can anyone give me any advice on anything else I can do.

  2. #2
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    I take it your car is off the road. If so, under the circumstances, a courtesy car would be a reasonable request, if a car has been provided, I don’t think there is much else, that would be productive, can be done but wait for Fords response to the letter.

  3. #3
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    Welcome to the site badattitude757. it seems that Ford are doing all they can, and as Wagolynn said, just wait and see.

    It would be interesting to know the outcome of this, so if you could let us know how it goes, good luck

  4. #4
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    Mar 2011
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    Thanks for the replies. Forgive me but I fail to understand how Ford are doing all they can when it has taken them 8 weeks so far not to fix my car and the Ford CRC tell me it could be another 4 weeks yet before they can supply the part. I have a courtesy car but it is not the one I paid over 14k for.

  5. #5
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    Sep 2009
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    There is little else to do. Trading Standards are the experts in this field and will provide the most appropriate advice. Following other advice may prejudice anything that TS have advised you to do. Was it TS you spoke to or Consumer Direct? Most local authority Trading Standards use CD as a first tier service (providing basic advice). If further action is needed, most TS departments provide civil advice and support to some extent (or they used to before the ConFib coalition decided to cut funding). Wait until any deadline has passed and if no joy, go back to TS (Or CD) who will advise further.

  6. #6
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    It's incredible that a component (in this case a wiring loom) should be so difficult to provide, when these must be arriving almost daily on the production line. A backward step from the old days, when a service department had people capable of actually repairing the fault; too many are now only able to carry out 'plug-and-play' operations.
    I have reservations about the 'expertise' of Trading Standards personnel. I once put a deposit on a used vehicle, and changed my mind two days later because I was not satisfied that the salesman had advised me of a more suitable model that was not on display. A dispute arose, so I contacted Trading Standards. They told me I had possibly left myself open to a dmages claim because a H.P. contract had been created. This despite the fact that, on the VW website, the very same vehicle was shown as being subject to 30-day 'no quibble' cash back/exchange guarantee. It was a franchised garage, and VW themselves sorted out the matter.

    I wonder if it is possible that the delay is because of a 'just in time' (JIT) practice. I once worked for a company which supplied the motor manufacturing industry. To keep storage and material costs to a minimum, we had to have materials arriving on a regular basis in limited quantities, and supply the finished products to the vehicle manufacturers in the same manner. Ford was a major player in this arrangement. The practice left a whole chain of possibilities for something to go wrong.

  7. #7
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    May 2007
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    I'm intrigued that a new vehicle has a corroded wiring loom! Personally, I think you should be entitled to change it for another vehicle on the grounds of it not being fit for purpose and the fact the fault is not something I would expect to find on a new car. Corroded wiring looms take a long time to develop this state.

    I think you should look further into getting a replacement new car or a refund. Under the consumer rules if the car develops a fault within 6 months it would be deemed to have been faulty at the time of sale and therefore, It could be argued that it was not fit for purpose at the time of the sale.

  8. #8
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    Quote......" when it has taken them 8 weeks so far not to fix my car" Ah! I must have misread that bit, I thought it was only days? Sorry about that



  9. #9
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    Mar 2011
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    same thing happened to me, ford were very slow!

  10. #10
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    In 2009, our daughter had an issue over paintwork on a brand new Fiesta, and what should have been a simple matter wasn't straightforward. Sounds as if Ford can't be bothered once they've sold the car.

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