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Thread: What are you Doing Today.

  1. #1301
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    Quote Originally Posted by smudger View Post
    ............It looks like my next project is going to be the back fence, as the stormy weather has eventually got to it, and it's been flattened!😧
    We moved to a new (to us) home in 1985. In those days I occasionally spent the odd few days away from home here and there in the course of my work.
    First time away after moving, a length of our garden fence blew down. This I repaired, and next time away another length blew down.
    We are a bit exposed with playing fields to the rear. So I set to and rebuilt the fences all the way around, using concrete spurs on which to mount the posts. Glad I did - with these gales we are getting now I wouldn't want to try to do fencing repairs at my age!

  2. #1302
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    Aye! I've been patching up that back fence for years, but now it's a complete rebuild! ............It's going to a big job, as I will doing it alone?........"......But I will wait until the weather is better.😇

  3. #1303
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    There are a number of panels down on one of my fences. I thought that it belonged to next door and as the owner doesn't live there, I wrote and asked him to get it fixed. He didn't accept that the fence was his so I looked at the original deeds which actually make it clear that all fences are jointly owned. We have agreed to go halves which makes me happy as I get to choose which panels and which way round they go. Fortunately all the posts are concrete ans still sound.

  4. #1304
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    I think it would be best if all garden boundary fences were shared. I had one side fence that was my responsibility, the other side the responsibility of my neighbour, and the bottom fence the responsibility of the local county council and which had the school caretaker's bungalow behind it. The latter was the hardest to get any interest in repairs. I took the initiative to rebuild all my fences, taking care to obey boundary lines which were fortunately still clearly defined, and now there cannot be any argument.
    Neighbours can be strange folk, though. Not ready to suggest a shared cost, but quite happy to nail their plant supports and other trivia to it.

  5. #1305
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    I don't get in well with the bloke next door, we have "history" where police were involved? He is arrogant, noisy, pig ignorant, and threatening, (even the police found him, "hard work to deal with"Anyway, the front fence is completely down, and has been for months, but he has no intention of replacing it, even though he put it up?My back fence doesn't border his land, it borders my upstairs neighbour, who is the complete opposite of the bloke next door, and easy going.

  6. #1306
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    When we moved to our present home, our neighbour whose house did not adjoin ours was a retired police sergeant and his wife. They owned the fence on that side, and it was in a poor state of repair. It was part pailing (his wife liked to know what was going on), and when some of the fence collapsed, I said I intended to have a traditional panel fence and that I would erect it on my side of the boundary and pay for the cost of the materials.
    This I did. His wife wasn't initially impressed with the resultant privacy, and her husband used to say, diplomatically, that good fences made good neighbours.

    From a small child up to when we were married, I lived in a terraced house and learned neighbourly friendship and the willingness to help others. I carried on with this attitude and helped many neighbours after we moved into the more isolated life of semi-detached. A small few of my neighbours responded likewise but, as they passed/moved on, our present neighbours and near-neighbours tend not to follow this help-each-other code. One or two I have helped do not even speak readily now. Where has this friendship gone?

  7. #1307
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    Yea! I've noticed that as well, since we moved down here, we have done nothing at all it upset anyone, and tried our best to fit in............................But since that row I had with our ignorant neighbour, ( who is local to this village) over his non stop barking dog, we have never really been accepted here?.........................There are a few nice people in our street who we get along fine with, but like I said, only a few.

  8. #1308
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    I have wondered if it is a knock-on effect of affluence. As one gets better off, is it that they see other folk as being less needed? And it probably isn't confined to the homes we live in.

    As caravanners, in the early days when we and many like us had oldish vans, fellow campers were friendly and ready to socialise and help each other. Now, with the much posher vans and home comforts, unless a group have planned a get together (in which case they meet up on one or other of their pitches) and virtually cold shoulder other campers. And then there are the evening "patrols", assessing their position in the pecking order for car and van specifications - not speaking as they pause to view, of course. Sad!

    Cars fall into the same category. When I first drove, like most others I had an old car and, again like most, a pre-war model. Should anyone have a breakdown, within minutes there would be a group of heads considering the situation and the best way of dealing with it. And many willing hands to tackle what had to be done to get the car moving again.
    Now, although there may still be the odd driver who would stop - glad to say I am one of them if it is safe to stop and assist - but the majority will sweep by without a thought.

    We must be about the oldest in our road (82 and 78) and, although reasonably fit for our age, at this time of year we can go a whole week without going out if the weather is really bad or icy. No neighbour has ever knocked on the door or rang the bell to just ask if we are OK. Fortunately, all our three offspring check daily by phone to make sure we are OK. Some old folk don't even have that luxury.

  9. #1309
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    I think it's modern society itself that has changed Snowball, for example, in the old days, when you stopped to help a fellow motorist, the last thing on your mind would be getting mugged, robbed, and your car stolen?..............Yet, these days, that's the first think that comes into your mind?...............................Back in the old days, we never saw junkies and gangs of "hoodies" patrolling the streets, drinking in public and threatening folk, and you felt safe to go to the corner shop at night...........................Not so these days, it's a sad fact if modern society..........................Of course the amount of cars on our roads these days, is a massive increase to what it was thirty years ago.............................I can't believe just how bad things have got in my lifetime, society and standards have dropped so far,it's just unbelievable?😠😡

  10. #1310
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    Agreed, smudger. I have to admit that I am cautious about approaching a lone female if she has broken down and I am driving alone - not such a problem when my wife is with me. Seeing a young child alone and in distress is another situation where one can be in a quandary about intervening. It happens frequently in shopping complexes - child wanders off whilst mum is wrapped up in selecting goods on display. My solution is to keep the child in view whilst immediately attracting a member of staff.

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