M-way drivers urged to take a break

M-way drivers urged to take a break

Motorway drivers are putting themselves at risk because not enough of them take breaks, a new survey suggests.

The Institute of Advanced Motorists ' (IAM) poll of 1,753 adults shows that 65% don't feel they even need motorway rests.

The road safety charity's research suggests that nearly four in five motorway drivers will only take one if the services are convenient to their journey.

IAM CEO Sarah Sillars warns that such behaviour puts drivers in danger of making many errors leading to serious accidents.

Only half of motorway users factor in a service area stop to their trip, while 2% totally overlook any planning.

Set against this, more than six out of 10 motor way drivers programme their destination into satnav journey planners . A further 85% ensure a full tank of fuel before embarking on long journeys.

One reason behind this could be the poor value for money at motorway services, according to a recent RAC poll.

IAM's research finds that 56% of drivers think service station fuel is too costly. A further 45% believe that service stations' drinks, snacks and food are substantially over-priced (45%).

As if to emphasise service stations' unattractiveness, the poll also finds that even 94%-plus of those who do stop there only do so to take a toilet break.

One in three people polled think toilet breaks are key to long-distance driving. Three in four motorists would prefer more Euro-style toilet and picnic-only break areas throughout Britain's motorway network and on the other main roads.

Ms Sillars says that motorists avoid motorway rest breaks because they wish to reach their destination sooner.

When it comes to concentration, Loughborough University studies have shown that mild dehydration alone can endanger drivers. Its driving simulator research showed that not taking in enough water can have the equivalent effect on motorists as drugs or alcohol, with moods and mental functioning also hampered.

Copyright Press Association 2015