Ford S-MAX review

Ford's first generation S-MAX demonstrated that larger MPVs don't have to be boring. The latest model reinforces that point. Jonathan Crouch drives it.

Ten Second Review

People-carrying MPVs do tend towards being a bit boring. They're ostensibly big boxes on wheels and notions of style or handling dynamics don't tend to come very far up the priority list for their manufacturers. Unless that manufacturer is Ford and that vehicle is an S-MAX. Ford's latest seven-seater offers better handling, greater efficiency and some amazingly clever safety features. It doesn't look like being deposed from its position as our favourite anytime soon.

Background

When the old S-MAX arrived in dealers back in 2006, we wondered what the heck it was. Didn't Ford already sell us a seven-seater called a Galaxy? Yet here was something that rode on the Galaxy chassis but was a bit more Miss Brahms and a bit less Mrs Slocombe. It looked great and Ford had made a number of subtle tweaks under the skin so that it drove as sharply as it was styled. It was an instant hit. True, it wasn't the first seven-seater that was great to drive. Honda's dull-looking Stream VTEC was a hoot to steer, but keep that little tip under your hats, used buyers. Anyway, the S-MAX lasted more than eight years, which is an eternity in this market, so the second generation model had better be good. Ford introduced the car in the Summer of 2015 and now we've thoroughly tested it.

Driving Experience

On the road, this car is as good to drive as ever. The range hinges around a family of 2.0-litre turbodiesel engines, offered in 120PS, 150PS and 180PS guises. The 150PS and 180PS 2.0-litre TDCi S-MAX models get six-speed manual 'boxes as standard but are also offered with Ford's six-speed PowerShift automatic gearbox and are available with intelligent all-wheel drive (I-AWD). The system continually measures how the car's wheels are gripping the road surface every 16 milliseconds; can adjust power delivery to individual wheels in 100 milliseconds; and can send 100 per cent of available engine torque to the rear wheels. Need more grunt? Try Ford's latest bi-turbo 2.0-litre TDCi engine, which develops 210 PS and 450Nm of torque, delivered from 2,000 rpm. Petrol engine options include Ford's fuel-efficient 160PS 1.5-litre EcoBoost with manual transmission and the 240PS 2.0-litre EcoBoost with 6-speed automatic transmission. Ford's clever integral link rear suspension helps enhance the signature car-like, sporty driving dynamics with a configuration that features reduced-weight aluminium components. Additional sound-deadening materials and improved door seals contribute to a quieter cabin. Road noise has been reduced by 2.5 decibels in the front and 3 decibels in the rear and Ford claims there's noticeably less wind noise than before.

Design and Build

Ford talks at length of this second generation model's sleeker styling avoiding "visual noise" but some may feel that the looks of this MK2 S-MAX design have lost a little of the visual impact that marked out its predecessor. The front pillar is moved further back to create a longer, sculpted bonnet and a raised chrome trapezoidal grille and slim headlight design target a 'technical' and cutting-edge look. There'll be much less debate about the rear three-quarter styling, with a distinctive window-line complemented by LED tail lights that add visual width. They're connected by a signature satin chrome strip, while a rear diffuser separates the exhaust outlets. There are no complaints about the cabin, Ford having done a great job of bringing a more upmarket feel to the fascia, with better materials used throughout and a cleaner centre stack. The steering wheel's a bit busy as a result but you'll get the hang of it. The seats retain the same 2-3-2 layout, this time with no fewer than 32 seating and load-space combinations, as well as Easy-Fold second and third row seats. The system enables each rear seat to be folded flat from a push-button control panel. The S-MAX now also features Easy-Entry second row seats that provide one touch access to third row seating with a new design that tips and slides the seat forward in one action. Storage also includes new covered stowage in the instrument panel top, a media storage area incorporated into the centre stack, and concealed under-floor stowage behind the third row. There's not a lot of luggage space, with the third row raised, but drop the rearmost seats and you have a really wide, conveniently-shaped 700-litre boot.

Market and Model

Prices start at just over £25,000 for base Zetec trim, with Titanium spec adding £1,700 to that asking price, both rates netting you a 1.5-litre EcoBoost petrol car. Go for ritzy Titanium Sport trim and that starts at just over £30,000 for the 180PS diesel, £1,500 more than its Titanium equivalent. The Zetec trim features 17-inch alloys, the SYNC2 infotainment system, parking sensors, keyless start, a DAB radio, sports seats, power fold mirrors, a tonneau cover, an electric handbrake and ISOFIX attachments for child seats in the second row. Go for Titanium spec - as 70% of S MAX customers do - and you get sat nav, privacy glass, rain sensing wipers and automatic headlights, LED daytime running lights, a lane keeping aid, keyless entry, traffic sign recognition, body-coloured trim bits and cruise control with adjustable speed limiter. Near the top of the range, the Titanium Sport comes with a body kit, 18-inch alloys, a rear spoiler, sports suspension and heated front seats. Beyond that, you can choose the ultimate S-MAX, the Vignale variant, with bespoke leather trim and a unique customr service package. Across the range, there are all sorts of extra-cost options, but perhaps the most intriguing is the Intelligent Speed Limiter, which reads speed limit signs and then prevents the vehicle exceeding the posted speed. Don't worry, you can switch it off if you like. Pre-Collision Assist with Pedestrian Detection also uses a camera-based system, this time to scan the road ahead, recognising the shapes of people and applying the brakes if the car thinks you're about to run over one.

Cost of Ownership

The diesel engines all return excellent economy. The most popular S-MAX is likely to be the 2.0 TDCi variant and in this one, you'll see 56.5mpg on the combined cycle and 129g/km of carbon dioxide whether you choose a 150PS or a 180PS version. You'll hit those returns by nearly 10% if you opt for four wheel drive or the Powershift automatic gearbox. At the top of the range, the 210PS Bi-Turbo manages 51.4mpg with 144g/km emissions. The 1.5-litre petrol model posts a 43.5mpg figure, but we'd take that with a pinch of salt. A small petrol engine is going to struggle to move a seven-seater, especially if you're running laden quite a bit. The 240PS petrol engine even posts a 35.8mpg and 180g/km. The warranty is a 3 year/60,000 mile deal with Ford Assistance for 1 year, providing roadside assistance in the UK and throughout Europe.

Summary

You'll have to make your own mind up on the aesthetics, but in every other regard, the latest S-MAX is a big step forward compared to its predecessor. The ethos remains the same, but the execution is a whole lot slicker. Mind you, it needed to be. The MPV market is one of the most dynamic, with new entrants and fresh ideas constantly popping up. Some may wonder whether this car really offers £2,000 of added utility over a cheaper Citroen C4 Grand Picasso, but that's going to very much depend on how much you enjoy driving. The engine choice seems to offer something for everyone and Ford is even bringing us a Vignale luxury edition where customers can specify the trims, equipment and finishes in a swish Vignale lounge. The S-MAX deserves the big billing. It's done the hard yards already and for families there really isn't a lot better.